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PostSubject: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeTue Oct 06, 2009 5:12 pm

Doctor Who is a British science fiction television programme produced by the BBC. The programme depicts the adventures of a mysterious alien time-traveller known as "the Doctor" who travels in his space and time-ship, the TARDIS, which normally appears from the exterior to be a blue 1950s police box. With his companions, he explores time and space, solving problems, facing a variety of foes and righting wrongs.

In my opion this a type of TV show that never gets old its somthing I think you should watch Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeTue Oct 06, 2009 5:19 pm

The Time War is an event referred to on several occasions in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, beginning from its revival in 2005. The conflict was between the Time Lords and the Daleks, resulting in their mutual destruction, which the series suggests was caused by the Doctor himself.[1] The Doctor also referred to this conflict as "the last great Time War," implying that there had been others.

The term "Time War" can also be applied to at least two types of time-spanning conflicts in the Doctor Who universe. The first type of time war is where the two sides are fighting the war across different points in history, separated by centuries or millennia. The second type of time war is where Time itself is used as a weapon, with preemptive strikes, time-loops, temporal paradoxes, and the reversal of historical events. The last great Time War could be of either variety or both (or neither).

It is implied in the various spinoff media that there have been several previous Time Wars, but that all traces of them have been removed from history. One such war is mentioned in the 1995 Virgin New Adventures novel Sky Pirates! by Dave Stone. Lasting thirty thousand years, it is fought between the Time Lords and other races that are developing time travel. The Time Lords destroy one such race, the Charon, before they even exist.[2] This war takes place a generation after the time of Rassilon, the founder of Time Lord society.

The last great Time War itself has been alluded to occasionally, but its events and progression have never been fully explained. Short comments in various episodes act as hints, and the war was not thoroughly talked about until "The Sound of Drums"/"Last of the Time Lords".

Contents [hide]
1 The Last Great Time War
1.1 Aftermath
1.2 Survivors
1.3 Doctor Who Annual 2006
1.4 Gallifrey audio series
2 Other Time Wars in Doctor Who
2.1 Eighth Doctor Adventures
2.2 Doctor Who comic strip
3 See also
4 References


[edit] The Last Great Time War
The last great Time War is first alluded to in the first episode of the 2005 series, "Rose". There, the Ninth Doctor explains to his companion, Rose Tyler, that the reason behind the Nestene Consciousness' invasion of Earth was because its food planets were destroyed in "the war". Later in the episode, the Doctor states that he fought in the war, but he was unable to save the Nestenes' planet or any other.

In the following episode, "The End of the World" (2005) set five billion years in the future, Jabe of the Forest of Cheem expresses amazement that the Doctor, a Time Lord, still exists, implying that the war had consequences up and down history. At the end of the episode, the Doctor confesses to Rose that the War had destroyed his home planet, leaving him the only surviving Time Lord.

In "The Unquiet Dead" (2005) the Doctor encounters the ghostly Gelth, aliens from another dimension, whose bodies had been destroyed by the war. The Gelth informed the Doctor that "the Time War raged, invisible to lower species but devastating to higher forms". In "Dalek" (2005), it is revealed that the Time Lords' adversaries in the war were the Daleks. The Doctor claims responsibility for the destruction of ten million Dalek ships, but also admits that the Time Lords "burned" with them. What actually started the war was not stated, but executive producer Russell T Davies commented in an episode of the documentary series Doctor Who Confidential that the origins of the war dated back to Genesis of the Daleks (1975) where the Time Lords send the Fourth Doctor into the past in an attempt to avert the Daleks' creation, or affect their development to make them less aggressive.

Further details of the War are sketchy; in "The Sound of Drums" (2007) the Master says that he was resurrected by the Time Lords because they believed he would be a "perfect warrior for a time war"; in "Doomsday" (2006) the Tenth Doctor mentions that he fought on the front lines, and was present at the Fall of Arcadia. "The Sound of Drums" states that the Doctor was responsible for destroying both the Dalek fleet and his home planet Gallifrey, after the Dalek Emperor gained control of the Cruciform. Although the single Dalek in "Dalek" had survived, the Doctor dismisses the possibility that other Time Lords may have survived as well, saying that he would have sensed it if they had. However, unknown to him, the Master also survived, albeit in human form, and had fled to a time period shortly before the end of the universe in an effort to escape from the Daleks.

According to General Staal of the Sontarans, his race tried to participate in the War but were forbidden. He also noted that the Doctor led the Time Lords in battle in the Time War.

In the episode "The Satan Pit", the beast calls The Doctor, "the killer of his own kind." Later, in "The Sound of Drums", the Doctor admits that he personally ended the war, in an act which caused the Time Lords, the Daleks and Gallifrey to burn. It is interesting to note that his actions cause the realization of his greatest fear, as established in the episode "The Mind of Evil". In the episode, he is forced to experience this fear, and afterward as he recovers from the incident, he describes it to his companion: "A whole world just disappeared in flames."

In "The Stolen Earth" the Time War was suggested to have gone on for at least a period of several years. The members of the Shadow Proclamation also express doubts as to the Doctor's identity, as the Time Lord race are "the stuff of legend."The Daleks' creator Davros was apparently destroyed in the first year of the Time War, after his ship was destroyed at the Gates of Elysium flying into the jaws of the Nightmare Child. Davros, however, was revealed later to have survived.

It is also stated that the whole of the Time War was "time-locked", so that no time traveler could go back into it, which explains why the Doctor cannot go back in time and undo his destruction of the Time Lords within the war (although Dalek Caan is able to circumvent this, albeit accidentally, and rescue Davros, at the cost of his sanity). This was also touched upon in "The Fires of Pompeii" (see also Blinovitch Limitation Effect).

[edit] Aftermath
Despite speculation in some fan quarters, there is no real evidence that the Time Lords were erased from history due to the Time War. Indeed, races such as the Forest of Cheem and the Krillitanes know of both the War and the Time Lords, although they describe them as extinct. Similarly, although the Daleks are described as having "vanished out of time and space" by Jack Harkness in the first series two-part finale, they are still known as a legend by the future inhabitants of Earth.

Why the Doctor does not encounter other time-travelling Time Lords or return to Gallifrey at a time before its destruction is not made explicit in the series although the use of the term "time locked" is suggestive. The Doctor does run into a Time Lord from a different era other than his own, specifically his own fifth incarnation, in the mini-episode "Time Crash".

The destruction of the Time Lords creates a vacuum that may have left history itself more vulnerable to change. In "The Unquiet Dead" (2005), the Doctor tells Rose that time is in flux, and history can change instantly — a more fluid definition to that which had been seen in earlier stories, which had implied that history was either immutable (The Aztecs, 1964) or capable of being changed only by very powerful beings (Pyramids of Mars, 1975; Remembrance of the Daleks, 1988). In "The Christmas Invasion", the Doctor himself significantly alters history when he indirectly brings down the government of Harriet Jones, whom he originally predicted would be elected for three terms and become the architect of Britain's "Golden Age". In the episodes "The Fires of Pompeii", "The Shakespeare Code" and "The Unicorn and the Wasp", the Doctor mentions that some points in time, such as the destruction of Pompeii, are fixed and unchangeable, while other events can be changed.

The most dramatic demonstration of this was in "Father's Day" (2005), when Rose creates a paradox by crossing her own timestream to save her father's life just before his destined death in a traffic accident. This summons the terrifying Reapers, who descended to "sterilise the wound" in time by devouring everything in sight. The Doctor states that if the Time Lords were still around, they could have prevented or repaired the paradox.

The consequences of creating a paradox are also why the Doctor cannot go back in time and save the Time Lords. Indeed, such actions may have directly contributed to their near-extinction: "They're all gone," the Ninth Doctor laments, "and now I'm going the same way." However, the Master's use of the retrofitted TARDIS as a paradox machine in "The Sound of Drums" (2007) demonstrates another possible implementation of a paradox, while in the episode "Blink" (2007) Billy Shipton states that the Tenth Doctor warned him that trying to alter his own timeline after having been sent into the past would "destroy two-thirds of the universe."

In episode "School Reunion" (2006) The Doctor is tempted by the Skasis Paradigm, which would give him the ability to reorder the universe, and allow him to stop the war. In "Rise of the Cybermen" (2006) the Doctor notes that when the Time Lords were around, travel between parallel universes was less difficult, but with their demise, the paths between worlds are now closed.

Other races also suffered casualties. The Nestene consciousness lost its homeworld and its protein-source planets, and the Gelth lost their physical form, being reduced to gaseous beings.

The Time War also provides a convenient in-story explanation for any contradictions in series continuity: for example, writer Paul Cornell has suggested that Earth's destruction by an expanding sun in "The End of the World" five billion years hence, as opposed to the original depiction of its demise around the year 10,000,000 AD (The Ark, 1966) can be attributed to changes in history due to the War.[3] Writer and future Doctor Who executive producer Steven Moffat has gone further, arguing that "a television series which embraces both the ideas of parallel universes and the concept of changing time can't have a continuity error — it's impossible for Doctor Who to get it wrong, because we can just say 'he changed time — it's a time ripple from the Time War'."[4]

[edit] Survivors
Although the Doctor initially believes himself to be the last survivor of the Time War, in "The Parting of the Ways" (2005) he discovers that, in addition to the lone Dalek in "Dalek", the Dalek Emperor itself had also survived, and had gone on to build a whole new Dalek race, using the organic material of Human cadavers by completely rewriting their DNA. The Doctor is convinced that he himself is the only surviving Time Lord, saying that he would know of any others (tapping his head: "In here") if they had. The destruction of the Emperor and his fleet at the conclusion of the 2005 series by a time vortex-augmented Rose Tyler is accompanied by her declaration that "the Time War ends."

In "Doomsday" (2006) it is revealed the elite Cult of Skaro survived by fleeing into the Void between dimensions and survived the original end of the Time War, taking with them the Genesis Ark, a Time Lord prison ship containing millions of Daleks. The new Dalek army released from the Ark is eventually sucked back into the Void, due to the actions of the Tenth Doctor, but the specially-equipped Cult of Skaro uses an "emergency temporal shift" to escape that fate. They reappear in New York, 1930 in "Daleks in Manhattan"/"Evolution of the Daleks" (2007); all but the Dalek Caan are killed in the story, leaving Caan as the last known living Dalek. Caan uses another emergency temporal shift to escape after the other three are killed. Caan returns again in the episode "The Stolen Earth" (2008).

In the 2007 episode "Gridlock" (2007) the Face of Boe says that while the Doctor is the "last of his kind," the Face of Boe says, "You are not alone". The acronym of which is 'YANA'. This duality is explained in "Utopia" (2007) where it is revealed that the Master had managed to survive his race's extinction by hiding in human form at the end of the universe, similar to how the Doctor had hidden from the Family of Blood in "Human Nature." The Master in his human form is known as Professor Yana, the acronym the Face of Boe had told to the Doctor before dying. Both used a device known as the Chameleon Arch, which rewrites Time Lord DNA, changing the subject's species and giving them new memories, while storing the original biological configuration and consciousness in a fob-watch for safekeeping.

The 2008 episode "The Stolen Earth" revealed that Davros had been present in the Time War. The Doctor saw his ship destroyed. While the war was time-locked, Caan nonetheless managed to use his temporal shift to return to it and rescue Davros, at the cost of his sanity. Davros subsequently used cells from his body to create a new Dalek Empire, and maintains Caan close at his side because of the latter's apparent loyalty (before Davros' betrayal by Dalek Caan) and his delphic ability to speak only the truth about the future.

[edit] Doctor Who Annual 2006
The Doctor Who Annual 2006, published by Panini in August 2005, contains an article entitled Meet the Doctor by Russell T Davies, which provides some additional background information on the Time War as seen in the television series, also mentioning in passing events depicted in the novels, audios, and comic strips.

The article describes the Time Lord policy of non-intervention, but states that on a "higher level," they protected the time vortex, and kept the peace. It further claims that two previous "Time Wars" had been fought: the first a skirmish between the Halldons (a race mentioned in the Terry Nation story We Are the Daleks from the Radio Times 10th Anniversary Special, 1973) and the Eternals (Enlightenment). The second was the brutal slaughter of the Omnicraven Uprising, with the Time Lords intervening on both occasions to settle matters.

The conflict between the Daleks and the Time Lords is described as "the Great (and final) Time War." Initial clashes included the Dalek attempt to infiltrate the High Council of the Time Lords with duplicates (Resurrection of the Daleks, 1984), and the open declaration of hostilities by one of the Dalek Puppet Emperors (possibly Davros in Remembrance of the Daleks); the Daleks claim these are merely in retaliation for the Time Lords' sending the Doctor back in time to change Dalek history in Genesis of the Daleks.

The article says that historical records are uncertain, but mentions two specific events in the lead-up to the war. The first was an attempted Dalek-Time Lord peace treaty initiated by President Romana under the Act of Master Restitution (a possible reference to the otherwise-unexplained trial of the Master on Skaro at the beginning of the BBC Doctor Who television movie, 1996). The second was the Etra Prime Incident (The Apocalypse Element), which some say "began the escalation of events." Weapons used by the Time Lords included Bowships, Black Hole Carriers and N-Forms (the last from Davies' 1996 New Adventures novel Damaged Goods), while the Daleks wielded "the full might of the Deathsmiths of Goth" (from the comic strip story Black Legacy by Alan Moore and David Lloyd, in Doctor Who Weekly #35-#38), and launched a massive fleet into the vortex (possibly in The Time of the Daleks).

The timelines of lesser races and planets shifted without the inhabitants of the worlds affected being aware of the changes in history, as they were a part of them (presumably including Humans). "Higher species" who were able to notice the changes included the Forest of Cheem, who were distraught at the bloodshed; the Nestene Consciousness, which lost all its planets, and further mutated; the Greater Animus, which died; the Eternals, who apparently fled this reality in despair, never to be seen again; and the Gelth, who were forced to take incorporeal form and hide themselves at the edge of the universe. The war lasted for years, and exactly how it ended is also not precisely known.

The article ends with a description of hierogylphics related to the Time War, carved on a mountainside on the distant planet Crafe Tec Heydra. There, under an image of a lone survivor walking away, the message "You are not alone" has been scratched, perhaps indicating that the Doctor was not the sole survivor of the conflict. [5] This is also the same message that the Face of Boe delivers to the Doctor in "Gridlock." On Martha Jones's MySpace[6] page, it is revealed that she and the Tenth Doctor, just prior to the events of "Human Nature" (2007) visited the Eye of Orion (previously seen onscreen at the start of The Five Doctors, 1983), where a shrine to the Time War stood. This may or may not be the same place mentioned in the Doctor Who Annual.

[edit] Gallifrey audio series
Gallifrey is the umbrella title of a series of audio plays by Big Finish Productions, set on Gallifrey during Romana's tenure as President. In Gallifrey: Panacea, the final chapter of the third series, the Time Lord Irving Braxiatel speaks of "rumours out there in the big wide universe — more than rumours, in fact — that something's coming to Gallifrey, something worse than you could possibly imagine."

Because of these rumours, Braxiatel engineers the removal of the Time Lord biodata archive from Gallifrey, in order that the Time Lords might someday be restored after their planet meets its doom. Former Big Finish producer Gary Russell indicated in a forum posting on Outpost Gallifrey that this was a reference to the television series' Time War.[7]

Like all Doctor Who spin-off media, its relationship to the ongoing story of the television series is open to interpretation.

[edit] Other Time Wars in Doctor Who
[edit] Eighth Doctor Adventures
In a story arc stretching through several of the Eighth Doctor Adventures, sometime in the Doctor's future, a war is fought between the Time Lords and an unnamed Enemy. In this story arc, Gallifrey is also destroyed as a result of the Eighth Doctor attempting to prevent the war from beginning, believing that it would be better for the Time Lords to die now rather than experience a war that would dehumanise them to the point of becoming monsters which all evidence suggests they could not win (The Ancestor Cell, 2000). This cataclysm also creates an event horizon in time that prevents anyone from entering Gallifrey's relative past or travelling from it to the present or future. Presumably, if the novels and the television series events are to be reconciled, at some point Gallifrey is restored, only to be destroyed again in the Time War. The last Eighth Doctor Adventures novel, The Gallifrey Chronicles, establishes that the Doctor has the ability to restore the planet and its inhabitants, having downloaded the contents of the Matrix into his subconscious mind in the minutes before Gallifrey's destruction, albeit at the cost of his own memories. However, the novel ends without revealing if he does indeed do this, although the Ninth Doctor's clear knowledge of his past suggests that he was at least able to restore his memories before his regeneration.

Series executive producer Russell T Davies wrote in Doctor Who Magazine #356 that there is no connection between the War of the books and the Time War of the television series, comparing Gallifrey being destroyed twice with Earth's two World Wars. He also said that he was "usually happy for old and new fans to invent the Complete History of the Doctor in their heads, completely free of the production team's hot and heavy hands."[8]

Despite Davies' unequivocal statement that the two wars are distinct, Lance Parkin, in his Doctor Who chronology A History, suggests in a speculative essay that the two destructions of Gallifrey may be the same event seen from two different perspectives, with the Eighth Doctor present twice (and both times culpable for the planet's destruction). This is supported due to the novels' destruction of Gallifrey involving an evil future version of the Eighth Doctor as the leader of the invading force, with the events leading to Gallifrey's destruction being triggered by the Doctor's attempt to prevent that future from coming to pass.[9]

Another version of the Eighth Doctor Adventures' War, referred to as the "War in Heaven," also appears in the Faction Paradox novels conceived by Lawrence Miles.

Doctor Who comic strip
In three comic strip stories written by Alan Moore and published in Doctor Who Monthly,[10] the Time Lords, assisted by The Special Executive, fight a time war early in their history against the Order of the Black Sun, based some thirty thousand years in their future.

The first strike of the war, from the Time Lords' point of view, is when a Black Sun agent travels back in time, and attacks the Time Lords just as they are about to turn the star Qqaba into a power source for their time experiments. This also causes the apparent demise of the stellar engineer Omega. The Time Lords do not know why the Black Sun
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeTue Oct 06, 2009 7:45 pm

Here is a music video for Doctor Who

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IUld2qcyNpw
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeTue Oct 06, 2009 7:48 pm

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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 10:30 am

New Doctor Who Logo for the Next Doctor.

http://io9.com/5375331/new-doctor-new-branding
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 2:02 pm

that is one cool title logo
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 2:49 pm

I have seen many Dr. Who-but with your descriptions I cannot wait to go back and view the episodes that I missed. Thanks for al the work done on summarizing the shows. sunny

I did like the Father's day episode of Dr. Who- Plus the 5 Dr. Who's It was Great to see what they as well as their companions looked like affraid
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 2:54 pm

The First Doctor is the name given to the initial incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. He was portrayed by the actor William Hartnell during his tenure from 1963 to 1966, and by Richard Hurndall in 1983, after Hartnell's death.



Biography
At the inception of the series the Doctor was a mysterious character and little was known about him except that he had a granddaughter, Susan Foreman, and that they were from another time and another world. He had a time machine, the TARDIS, which was disguised as a police box and was bigger on the inside than on the outside. He and Susan were in exile as well, for unspecified reasons. It would not be until the last adventure of the Doctor's second incarnation that the name of the Doctor's people (the Time Lords) would be revealed, and the third before the name of his home planet (Gallifrey) was first spoken.

The series began with schoolteachers Ian Chesterton and Barbara Wright investigating the mystery of Susan, a student who appeared to possess scientific and historical knowledge far beyond her years. Discovering the TARDIS in a scrapyard, they were involuntarily taken by the Doctor on a journey back to the year 100,000 BC, and spent two years adventuring through time and space with the Doctor.

It was during this incarnation that the Doctor first met the Daleks and the Cybermen, races that would become his most implacable foes. The TARDIS crew also observed many historical events such as the Reign of Terror in revolutionary France, meeting Marco Polo in China and The Aztecs in Mexico. When Susan fell in love with the human resistance fighter David Campbell, the Doctor left her behind to allow her to build a life for herself on 22nd century Earth (The Dalek Invasion of Earth), although he promised to return someday. The TARDIS crew were soon joined by Vicki, whom they rescued from the planet Dido.

At the conclusion of a chase through time, Ian and Barbara used a Dalek time machine to go home (The Chase), and their place in the TARDIS was taken by a space pilot named Steven Taylor. Together, they met another member of the Doctor's race for the first time in the form of the Meddling Monk and had an adventure in Galaxy 4. During the siege of Troy, Vicki decided to leave the TARDIS to stay with Troilus. The Doctor and Steven were next briefly joined by Katarina and Sara Kingdom, but both were killed during the events of The Daleks' Master Plan.

After narrowly missing the Massacre of St Bartholomew's Eve, the Doctor and Steven took on board a young girl named Dodo Chaplet. Dodo brought a cold virus to the far future, which nearly annihilated the humans and Monoids travelling on The Ark. One of the First Doctor's most deadly foes was the Celestial Toymaker, who forced him and his companions to play deadly games. Eventually, the Doctor managed to win the Trilogic Game allowing them all to escape the Toymaker's domain.

Eventually, Steven and Dodo left the Doctor as well, Steven remaining on an alien planet as a mediator (The Savages), and Dodo deciding to remain on Earth in 1966. The Doctor was then joined by Polly and Ben Jackson who would be the first companions to witness a most remarkable event.

The toll of years put strain on the Doctor's elderly frame. After defeating the Cybermen at the Antarctic Snowcap Station (The Tenth Planet), the Doctor collapsed inside the TARDIS, and before the astonished eyes of his then-companions Ben and Polly, his cells renewed themselves for the first time, giving him a completely new physical appearance and character — the Second Doctor.

Personality
From the beginning, the First Doctor was a mysterious figure. He appeared to be a frail old man, despite the eventual revelation that he was actually the youngest of the Doctor's incarnations, and yet was possessed of unexpected reserves of strength and will. (An early writers' guide by script editor David Whitaker describes "Doctor Who" [sic] as "frail-looking but wiry and tough as an old turkey".) He obviously held tremendous knowledge of scientific matters, and yet was unable to pilot his TARDIS time ship reliably; his granddaughter Susan explained this by saying that her grandfather was "a bit forgetful". He was abrasive, patronising, and cantankerous towards his human travelling companions, yet shared a deep emotional bond with his granddaughter Susan. He also harboured a streak of ruthlessness, being willing to lie — and in one case attempt to kill — to achieve his goals. Initially, he distrusted his first two human companions, Ian Chesterton and Barbara Wright, who were forced on him. Over time, however, as they shared adventures together, he grew closer to them, and the TARDIS crew came to share almost a family bond.

Eventually, the Doctor began to enjoy his travels through time and space, taking people along for the ride and was always reluctant and sad to see them go, even when he knew it was for their own good. The Doctor's personality mellowed around the time of the serial Marco Polo, and he evolved into the more familiar grandfatherly figure that children loved. Despite his age, the Doctor was never conservative, and was always a bit of an anti-establishment figure, opposing tyranny and overreaching authority in all its forms.

It was also during this time that the Doctor first met what would become his most persistent adversaries — the Daleks and the Cybermen. It would be the latter encounter that would see the Doctor first regenerate; stating "This old body of mine's wearing a bit thin," he collapsed at the end of the serial, regenerating inside the TARDIS into the Second Doctor.

William Hartnell described the Doctor as "a wizard", and "a cross between the Wizard of Oz and Father Christmas". One quirk of the First Doctor was his tendency to become occasionally tongue-tied and stumble over words. Sometimes this was a deliberate acting choice: William Russell recalls that it was Hartnell's idea for the Doctor to get Ian Chesterton's surname wrong, calling him "Chesserman" or "Chatterton". This character choice also gave the series' producers the ability to use takes in which Hartnell flubbed his lines. Due to the series' tight production schedule, it was rarely possible to reshoot such scenes and dubbing the dialogue was usually not an option. Hartnell suffered from undiagnosed arteriosclerosis, which affected his ability to remember lines, increasingly so as his time on the series progressed.

In the original pilot, the Doctor wore contemporary clothes (Including a suit and tie). When the pilot was reshot, however, his costume changed to a more Edwardian ensemble. The first incarnation of the Doctor carried a wooden staff, with a twisted handle.

Story style
The original First Doctor episodes had individual titles (see Season 1). This led to a problem as to the naming of the serials into which the episodes were grouped. See Doctor Who story title controversy for more information.

The programme was designed to be educational, so the stories were divided into two genres: historical (to teach about history) and futuristic (to teach about science), and in fact these two genres alternated with each other. However, by the end of the second season it became apparent that the futuristic stories were much more popular and the production team began to phase out the "historicals".

The debut of the Daleks in the second serial turned the programme from a children's series to a national phenomenon. It soon became a show that the whole family gathered to watch, with monsters that children viewed from between their fingers or from behind the sofa. Intelligent and witty scripts filled with far-out concepts compensated for the relatively low budget and unsophisticated special effects, laying the foundation for decades of stories to come.

Later appearances
Despite the regeneration, television audiences would see the First Doctor on screen twice more (not counting flashbacks or charity specials like Dimensions in Time). In 1973, for the 10th anniversary of the programme, Hartnell appeared in The Three Doctors which also saw Patrick Troughton reprise his role as the Second Doctor. Due to failing health, however, Hartnell could not participate in any of the regular filming, and his scenes were shot separately at Ealing Studios (not his garden or garage at home, as long suggested by fan legend).

Shortly after this filming, in 1975, William Hartnell died. In the 20th anniversary special The Five Doctors, the role of the First Doctor was played by Richard Hurndall, although the episode began with a clip of Hartnell as the Doctor from The Dalek Invasion of Earth. Where the two specials fit in the First Doctor's chronology is unclear.

In Dimensions in Time the Fourth Doctor (Tom Baker) refers to the First as "the grumpy one". The First Doctor is seen as a sketch in John Smith's book alongside other past Doctors in the episode "Human Nature". In "Time Crash", the Tenth Doctor says to the Fifth, "Back when I first started, at the very beginning, I was always trying to be old and grumpy and important, like you do when you're young." A brief clip of the First Doctor appears in "The Next Doctor".

The character has also appeared in many licensed novels, comic strips, and audio dramas.
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 2:57 pm

The Second Doctor is the name given to the second incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. He was portrayed by character actor Patrick Troughton.



Biography
The First Doctor grew progressively weaker while battling the Cybermen during the events of The Tenth Planet and eventually collapsed, seemingly from old age. His body renewed itself and transformed into the Second Doctor.

Initially, the relationship between the Second Doctor and his predecessor was unclear. In his first story, the Second Doctor referred to his predecessor in the third person as if he were a completely different person.

During this incarnation, the Second Doctor confronted familiar foes such as the Daleks and the Cybermen, as well as new enemies such as the Great Intelligence and the Ice Warriors. It was during this time that he first met Alistair Gordon Lethbridge-Stewart, a military man who would later become the leader of the British contingent of UNIT, a military organisation tasked to investigate and defend the world from extraterrestrial threats.

The Second Doctor's time came to an end after he was put on trial by his own people, the Time Lords, for breaking their laws of non-interference. Despite the Doctor's argument that the Time Lords should use their great powers to help others, he was sentenced to exile on 20th century Earth, the Time Lords forcing his regeneration into the Third Doctor in the process.

The successful transformation into the Second Doctor, a figure who was the same essential character as the first but with a very different persona, was a turning point in the evolution of Doctor Who the series as well as the character of the Doctor, and was a critical ingredient in the longevity of the series.

Personality
He has been nicknamed the "Cosmic Hobo" as the impish Second Doctor appeared to be far more scruffy and child-like than his first incarnation. Mercurial, clever, and always a few steps ahead of his enemies, at times he could be a calculating schemer who would not only manipulate people for the greater good but act like a bumbling fool in order to have others underestimate his true abilities (The Tomb of the Cybermen, The Evil of the Daleks, and The Dominators). But despite the bluster and tendency to panic when events got out of control, the Second Doctor always acted heroically and morally in his desire to help the oppressed. More than any other perhaps, this incarnation of the Time Lord was a wolf in sheep's clothing.

This Doctor is associated with the catch phrase "oh my giddy aunt", and is noted for playing the recorder.

Story style

Early promotional photo of the Second Doctor from 1966.With the arrival of a younger Doctor and changing tastes, the Second Doctor's tenure was characterised by a faster pace and a preference toward "monster of the week" style horror stories whilst the purely historical adventures that were a recurring feature of the Hartnell-era ceased with The Highlanders, the only Troughton-era entry in that genre. While Troughton's Doctor would still visit the Earth's past, he would always encounter an alien such as the Daleks or the Great Intelligence. It was also during this era that Doctor Who began to come under fire for its purportedly violent and frightening content.

As with his predecessor, all the Second Doctor's original episodes were in black and white. Later guest appearances in The Three Doctors, The Five Doctors and The Two Doctors were in colour. However, Troughton's reign as the Doctor was more notable for what does not exist than for what does, as many of the episodes featuring the Second Doctor were junked by the BBC — a full list of incomplete Doctor Who serials shows how many of these episodes are missing from the BBC Archives.

Only one story, The Tomb of the Cybermen, in Troughton's first two seasons still exists in its entirety, ten stories only exist partially (most with one or two episodes out of 4 or 6), and four are lost in their entirety, including his first story, The Power of the Daleks; Jamie's first adventure, The Highlanders, The Macra Terror; and Fury From the Deep.

Due to what would appear to be continuity errors in Trougton's later appearances (particularly in The Two Doctors), some fans have speculated that the Time Lords used the Second Doctor as an agent after the events of The War Games, and that he did not in fact immediately regenerate and enter his exile on Earth. (See Season 6B for further details).

Both Peter Davison and Colin Baker, who played the Fifth Doctor and Sixth Doctor respectively, have stated that the Second Doctor is their favourite.

Later appearances

The Second Doctor in The Two Doctors (1985).The Second Doctor would return to the series on three occasions: in 1973 for the 10th anniversary serial The Three Doctors (which also saw the return of William Hartnell as the First Doctor), in 1983 for the 20th anniversary special, The Five Doctors, and once more in 1985 in The Two Doctors. An official accounting of where these three adventures fit within the Second Doctor's chronology has yet to be offered, although there is longstanding fan speculation that the latter two stories might take place within the hypothetical Season 6B. A brief clip of the Second Doctor appears in "The Next Doctor".

[edit] Other mentions
Visions of the Second Doctor appear in Day of the Daleks, The Brain of Morbius, Earthshock, Mawdryn Undead and Resurrection of the Daleks.
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 2:58 pm

The Third Doctor is the name given to the third incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor; seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. He was portrayed by actor Jon Pertwee.



[edit] Biography
After the Doctor was found guilty of breaking the Time Lord laws of non-interference and forced to regenerate, he began his third incarnation in exile on 20th century Earth. The Third Doctor immediately formed a working relationship with the British contingent of UNIT, an international organisation tasked to investigate and defend the Earth against extraterrestrial threats.

It was a partnership initially born out of convenience — the Doctor required facilities to try to repair his TARDIS to break the exile, and UNIT needed his expertise to combat the threats they encountered. There is some disagreement about when the Third Doctor's UNIT stories were set, with some evidence that they were contemporary stories set at the same time they were broadcast (the early 70s), and some evidence that they were set in the near future. According to the production team, there was an intention to set the stories in the near future, but the writers did not always remember this and set the stories in the present.

The Doctor also developed a good working relationship with Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart, whom he had first encountered, in his previous incarnation, as a Colonel in command of troops fighting Yeti and the Cybermen. As well as the Brigadier, he developed friendships with other regular UNIT colleagues including Sergeant Benton and Captain Mike Yates. When meteors were seen falling to Earth in Essex, the Doctor together with a UNIT scientist named Liz Shaw were to face the Autons for the first time. The Autons were to be one of the Doctor's recurring foes. At the conclusion of this adventure, the Doctor became UNIT's scientific advisor. After facing Silurians, the so-called Ambassadors of Death and the Inferno project, Liz was replaced as the Doctor's assistant by a feisty but slightly scatter-brained young woman named Jo Grant.

After meeting Jo, the Third Doctor encountered his greatest nemesis (next to the Daleks) — the Master. A renegade Time Lord, the Master plagued the Third Doctor with his diabolical schemes, including the summoning of an ancient Dæmon, and unleashing the terrifyingly powerful Kronos, a Chronovore. The Doctor's exile continued until it was lifted by the Time Lords after he helped save them from destruction at the hands of Omega. The Third Doctor, free to roam space and time again, soon ran into the Master and an even older enemy — the Daleks. Although the Master was a criminal genius, the Doctor was always able to outwit him in all his schemes. Whilst facing the ecological destruction wrought by Global Chemicals and the super computer BOSS, Jo met and fell in love with Dr. Clifford Jones. Marrying Jones and following him to the Amazon on an expedition, Jo left a saddened Doctor.

The fiercely independent investigative journalist Sarah Jane Smith became the Doctor's new companion after stowing away in his TARDIS. The Third Doctor's final adventures saw them defeating the Sontarans in medieval England and the Daleks on the planet Exxilon. The Third Doctor contracted radiation poisoning on the planet Metebelis 3, during the events of Planet of the Spiders. When the TARDIS brought him back to UNIT headquarters, he collapsed, regenerating into the Fourth Doctor.

[edit] Personality
The Third Doctor was a suave, authoritative man of action, who not only practiced Venusian Aikido (or Karate), but enjoyed working on gadgets and riding all manner of vehicles, such as the Whomobile and his pride and joy, the canary-yellow vintage roadster nicknamed "Bessie" which featured such modifications as a remote control, dramatically increased speed capabilities and even inertial dampeners.

While this incarnation spent most of his time exiled on Earth, where he grudgingly worked as UNIT's scientific advisor, he would occasionally be sent on covert missions by the Time Lords, where he would often act as a reluctant mediator. Even though he developed a fondness for Earthlings with whom he worked (such as Liz Shaw and Jo Grant), he would jump at any chance to return to the stars with the enthusiasm of a far younger man than himself (as can be seen in his frivolous attitude in The Mutants). If this Doctor had a somewhat patrician and authoritarian air, he was just as quick to criticise authority too—having little patience with self-inflated bureaucrats, parochially-narrow ministers, knee-jerk militarists or red tape in general. His courageousness could easily turn to waspish indignation. It is thus no surprise that a common catchphrase of his was "Now listen to me."

Despite his arrogance, the Third Doctor genuinely cared for his companions in a paternal fashion, and even held a thinly-veiled but grudging admiration for his nemesis, the Master, and for UNIT's leader, Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart, with whom he eventually became friends. In fact, even when his much resented exile was lifted, the highly moral and dashing Third Doctor continued to help UNIT protect the Earth from all manner of alien threats.

In general, this incarnation of the Doctor was more physically daring than the previous two, and was the first to attack an enemy physically if cornered (both of his previous incarnations would nearly always attempt to dodge, flee or negotiate rather than directly defend themselves). This often took the form of quick strikes, with the occasional joint lock or throw - usually enough to get himself and anyone accompanying him out of immediate danger - but usually not to the extent of a brawl, in keeping with the Doctor's non-violent nature. He would only use his fighting skills if he had no alternative, and even then generally disarmed his opponents rather than knock them unconscious. Indeed, his martial prowess was such that a single, sudden strike was usually enough to halt whatever threatened him, and at one point he reminded Captain Yates (physically as well as verbally) that Yates would have a difficult time removing him from somewhere when he did not want to be removed (The Mind of Evil).

Perhaps due to his time spent on Earth, or maybe just as a function of his pacifistic and authoritative tendencies, the Third Doctor was a skilled diplomat (keeping talks going in The Curse of Peladon, for example) and linguist, as well as having an odd knack for disguises - all of this, combined with his formidable galactic experience, often allowed the Third Doctor to play a central role in the events he found himself in.

[edit] Appearance
Occasionally camp but always charismatic, this Doctor had a personal manner of dress which is the most ornate of his various incarnations, favouring frilled shirts, velvet smoking or dinner jackets in blue, orange, green, burgundy or black, evening trousers, formal boots and opera and hunting cloaks for his regular outfit, with variations and accessories including bow ties, cravats and leather gloves, earning him the nickname "the Dandy Doctor". In The Three Doctors, the First Doctor, commenting on the Third and Second Doctor respectively, disparagingly referred to them as "a dandy and a clown".

[edit] Story style
The Third Doctor stories were the first to be broadcast in colour. The early ones were set on Earth due to cost constraints[1] on the series. To explain this, the Second Doctor was banished to Earth by his race the Time Lords, and forced to regenerate. On Earth he worked with the Brigadier and the rest of the UNIT team. However, as his tenure progressed he had reasons to leave Earth, on occasions being sent on missions by the Time Lords. Eventually, after his defeat of the renegade Omega in The Three Doctors he was granted complete freedom by the Time Lords in gratitude for saving Gallifrey.

The Third Doctor's era introduced many of the Doctor's more memorable adversaries. The Autons, the Master, Omega, the Sontarans, the Silurians and the Sea Devils all made their debut during this period, and the Daleks returned after a five-year absence about halfway through Pertwee's run. The Third Doctor was the only one from the classic series not to have a story featuring the Cybermen- although the Ninth Doctor has never had a confrontation with them either-, but he did eventually encounter them during The Five Doctors.

[edit] "Reverse the polarity"
The catchphrase most associated with the Third Doctor's era is probably "reverse the polarity of the neutron flow". The phrase was Pertwee's way of dealing with the technobabble that he was required to speak as the Doctor. Terrance Dicks recalls that he had used the line in a script, and Pertwee approached him about the line. Dicks had feared that he would have to remove it, but Pertwee stated that he liked it, and wanted to see it more often. Dicks obliged.[2]

Many fans of the show believe that it is scientifically impossible to reverse the polarity of a neutron flow. In actuality, it is possible for neutrons to flow and, since neutrons have a magnetic moment,[3] it is possible in theory (although difficult in practice) to have a stream of neutrons polarised along or against their direction of motion. Given this, such a polarity could presumably be reversed. However, the phrase is still meaningless in the contexts in which the series uses it.

Pertwee did not use the phrase as often as popular belief has it. The Third Doctor only said the full phrase "reverse the polarity of the neutron flow" once on screen during his tenure — in the 1972 serial The Sea Devils — and also in the 1983 20th Anniversary special The Five Doctors. Pertwee used the phrase again, in 1989, when he acted in the stage play Doctor Who - The Ultimate Adventure. (When Colin Baker took over the lead role in the play he amended the line to "Reverse the linearity of the proton flow.") In the radio play The Paradise of Death the Brigadier asks "Reverse the polarity of the neutron flow?" and the Doctor proceeds to explain that the phrase is meaningless.

On five other occasions on screen, the Third Doctor simply "reversed the polarity" of other things. He tells Ruth to reverse the temporal polarity of the TOMTIT device in The Time Monster; he reverses the polarity of his sonic screwdriver in Frontier in Space; he reverses the polarity of some dismantled circuitry in Planet of the Daleks; he tells Osgood to reverse the polarity of the diathermic energy exchanger in The Dæmons; and he reverses the polarity of the timescoop in Invasion of the Dinosaurs.

The full phrase was used in several Target novelisations. It was subsequently used by the Fourth Doctor (in City of Death) and the Fifth Doctor (in Castrovalva and Mawdryn Undead). Together with The Five Doctors this resulted in the phrase being used as a nostalgic reference three times as often as it was originally said. In the Tenth Doctor episode "The Lazarus Experiment" the Doctor, while hiding in Lazarus' machine, comments that it had taken him too long to reverse the polarity due to being out of practice; the Tenth Doctor uses the full phrase in "Music of the Spheres".

The phrase has entered geek culture, although this has been more through its use as technobabble. Mention of reversing a device's polarity in the context of science fiction television had been made prior to Doctor Who, in The Outer Limits episode The Borderland, and also the Star Trek: The Original Series episode "That Which Survives". Subsequently it was in the Stargate SG-1 episodes "Learning Curve" and "200", the film Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, and the South Park episode, "Cancelled", in Lab Rats episode "A Snail", . The phrase appears in various The Real Ghostbusters episodes, such as Egon's Ghost. The phrase has also featured in the dialogue of the musical We Will Rock You, amongst other references to popular culture. In the musical Return to the Forbidden Planet, the audience are required to help the cast "reverse polarity" in order to save the ship. The phrase also appears in The Transformers: The Movie and an episode of ITV's Science Fiction Series "Primeval". It also appears in Pokémon: Jirachi Wish Maker.

[edit] Title sequence and logo
The original title sequence for the Third Doctor's seasons was an extension of the "howlround" kaleidoscopic patterns used for the previous Doctors, incorporating Pertwee's face and adding colour to showcase Doctor Who being broadcast in colour for the first time. In the Third Doctor's final season, a new title sequence was introduced, designed by Bernard Lodge. Partially inspired by the slit-scan hyperspace sequence in Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, one portion of this sequence is the prototype for the classic time tunnel sequence of the Fourth Doctor's seasons. The Third Doctor's final season also introduced the equally classic diamond logo which would remain in use until 1980.

The series logo introduced in 1970 and used for the first four seasons of Pertwee's tenure would later be used again as the logo for the 1996 Doctor Who TV movie and subsequently once again became the official Doctor Who logo, most notably with regards to products connected to the Eighth Doctor. With the introduction of a new official series logo in 2005, the Pertwee era logo continued to be used by Big Finish Productions as the logo for all pre-2005 series material including books and audio dramas, and by the BBC on DVD releases of episodes from the 1963-89 series.

Later appearances
The Third Doctor would appear once more officially in the 20th anniversary special The Five Doctors, broadcast in 1983. However, where it takes place within the Third Doctor's chronology is unclear, although as he clearly recognises companion Sarah-Jane Smith it probably occurs at a point after the season 11 episode The Time Warrior. Pertwee played the role on screen one last time in the 1993 charity special Dimensions in Time. A brief clip of the Third Doctor appears in "The Next Doctor".

Other mentions
Visions of the Third Doctor appear in The Brain of Morbius, Mawdryn Undead and Resurrection of the Daleks. A portrait of him is seen in Timelash.
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 3:38 pm

The Fourth Doctor is the name given to the fourth incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. He was portrayed by Tom Baker for seven consecutive years and is, as of 2009[update], the longest-living incarnation in the show's on-screen history. For American audiences, who saw the show only in syndication (mostly on PBS), it was this incarnation of the Doctor who is the best known, as his episodes were the ones most frequently broadcast stateside.




[edit] Overview
The Fourth Doctor's eccentric style of dress and speech — particularly his trademark long scarf and fondness for jelly babies — made him an immediately recognisable figure and he quickly captivated the viewing public's imagination. This incarnation is generally regarded as the most recognisable of the Doctors and one of the most popular, especially in the United States. In polls conducted by Doctor Who Magazine, Tom Baker has lost the "Best Doctor" category only twice: once to Sylvester McCoy (the Seventh Doctor) in 1990, and once to David Tennant (the Tenth Doctor) in 2006.[1]

The Fourth Doctor appeared in seven consecutive seasons over a seven-year period, from 1974 to 1981, making him the longest running Doctor on screen. He also appeared in the specials The Five Doctors (via footage from the uncompleted Shada) and Dimensions in Time, Tom Baker's last appearance in-character as the Doctor (aside from a series of television advertisements in New Zealand in 1997[2]).

There are also novels and audio plays featuring the Fourth Doctor. Two early audio plays featuring Tom Baker voicing the Fourth Doctor date from Baker's television tenure as he had mainly declined to appear in any further audio plays since leaving the series. In 2009, however, it was announced that a new five part series would be produced by BBC Audio (see below).

[edit] Biography
After contracting radiation poisoning on the planet Metebelis 3, the Third Doctor makes his way back to UNIT headquarters, where the Time Lord K'Anpo Rimpoche aids him in regenerating (Planet of the Spiders).

In his new incarnation, the Doctor draws back from continuous involvement with UNIT (with which he had worked closely as the Third Doctor) and the Time Lords. The Time Lords continue to send him on occasional missions, including an attempt to prevent the creation of the Daleks (Genesis of the Daleks), during which he also meets a new adversary, Davros. The Doctor travels with journalist Sarah Jane Smith, whom he had befriended prior to his regeneration, and, for a time, with UNIT Surgeon-Lieutenant Harry Sullivan.

The Doctor's companionship with Sarah Jane is ended when he receives a telepathic summons to Gallifrey, as humans were not then allowed on the planet. The summons is part of a trap set by his enemy the Master, who has used up all his regenerations and become little more than a withered husk. The Master frames the Doctor for the assassination of the President of the High Council of Time Lords. In order to avoid execution the Doctor invokes an obscure law and declares himself a candidate for the office, giving himself the time he needs to defeat the Master. (The Deadly Assassin)

The Doctor is seen to travel alone for the first time since season 1, returning to a planet he had visited centuries before. During his previous visit, he had accidentally imprinted a human colony ship's powerful computer, Xoanon, with his own mind, leaving it with multiple personalities. On his second visit the Doctor is remembered as an evil god by the descendants of the colonists, some of whom had become a warrior tribe called the Sevateem. After the Doctor cures the computer, one of the Sevateem, Leela, joins him on his travels (The Face of Evil). The Doctor brings the intelligent but uneducated Leela to many locales in human history, teaching her about science and her own species' past. In Victorian London, the pair encounters the magician Li Hsien Chang and his master, the self-styled Weng-Chiang (The Talons of Weng-Chiang). Later, the Doctor and Leela visit the Bi-Al Foundation medical centre, where they acquire the robot dog K-9 (The Invisible Enemy).

The Doctor returns to Gallifrey and declared himself Lord President, based on the election held during his previous visit. This is a ploy to reveal and defeat a Sontaran invasion plan. Leela and K-9 decide to remain on Gallifrey; the Doctor comforts himself by producing K-9 Mark II (The Invasion of Time).

Shortly afterwards, the powerful White Guardian assigns the Doctor to find the six segments of the Key to Time, sending a young Time Lady named Romana to assist him. The two Gallifreyans find the six segments and defeat the equally powerful Black Guardian, who sought the Key for himself. After the conclusion of the quest, Romana regenerates into a new form (Destiny of the Daleks).

For a time, the Fourth Doctor and the second incarnation of Romana travel in another universe known as E-Space. There, they are joined by the young prodigy Adric. When the Doctor finds a way to leave E-Space, Romana and K-9 Mark II choose to remain behind. Adric and the Doctor are joined by the aristocratic orphan Nyssa of Traken and, in the Fourth Doctor's last adventure, by the opinionated Tegan Jovanka.

The conduit between E-Space and our own universe is revealed to be a Charged Vacuum Emboitment (CVE) — created by the mathematicians of Logopolis as part of a system to allow the Universe to continue on past its point of heat death. As he investigates this, the Fourth Doctor begins experiencing ominous feelings and spots a white-clad entity, "The Watcher," observing him. After succeeding in stopping the Master from disrupting the CVEs and destroying the universe, the Fourth Doctor is mortally wounded when he falls from the Pharos Project radio telescope control tower, where he utters his last words: "It's the end -- but the moment has been prepared for." The Watcher is revealed as a manifestation of the Doctor's future incarnation. Before the eyes of the Doctor's companions, the Watcher merges with the Fourth Doctor, regenerating him into the Fifth Doctor.

The Fourth Doctor appears once more in the 20th anniversary special The Five Doctors. A renegade Time Lord attempts to pull the first five incarnations of the Doctor out of time, inadvertently trapping the Fourth Doctor (and Romana) in a "time eddy" from which they are later freed. A brief holographic clip of the Fourth Doctor appears in "The Next Doctor".

[edit] Personality
)

The fourth Doctor was known for his love of Jelly BabiesThe Fourth Doctor is a natural bohemian who permanently left UNIT in order to return to a life of deep universal wandering. More so than his previous incarnations, he is thrilled by discovery and adventure. Galvanised by higher purpose, he is disarmingly loopy (constantly offering friends and foes jelly babies; this trait is referenced in the Tenth Doctor episode 'The Sound of Drums', where the John Simm incarnation of the Master is seen enjoying a bag of jelly babies on board the Valiant), brilliant and entirely serious, all at the same time. To an extent, the Fourth Doctor is the most unpredictable of his incarnations, befuddling all with his intelligence, constantly leaving others wondering if they have his full attention and using his more off the wall mannerisms against adversaries to distract them while arranging to take control of the situation. His keen judge of character also enables him to navigate his way through situations with new people, helping him to discern friend from foe. Although like all his selves he prefers his brain over his brawn, he is a capable swordsman and wrestler, following on from the martial expertise of his immediate former self. He improvises non-lethal weaponry when necessary (Genesis of the Daleks) but was also not averse to more lethal weaponry as a necessity, against both sentient and non-sentient beings (The Invasion of Time, The Talons of Weng-Chiang).

Despite his charm and offbeat humour, the Fourth Doctor is arguably more aloof and sombre than his previous incarnations. He could become intensely brooding, serious and even callous, and would keenly scrutinise his surroundings even when playing the fool. He could also be furious with those he saw as stupid, frivolous, misguided or evil. When taking charge, he could be considered authoritative to the point of egocentricity, but as it is, he is usually the only one capable of solving the situations he finds himself in. He generally maintained his distance from the Time Lords even after they had lifted his exile, and resented that they were now capable of re-entering his life when they deemed it necessary. Not only did he seem more inclined toward a solitary existence (The Deadly Assassin), he also emphasised his distance from humanity, although he stated on more than one occasion that he found mankind to be his favourite species.

Two of the Doctor's most significant companionships occur during his fourth incarnation. His friendship with Sarah Jane Smith is implied to be deeper than the relationships he shared with other companions to that point (as alluded to in the Tenth Doctor episode School Reunion). She is consequently still profoundly affected by their separation many years later in her personal timeline. His relationship with Romana (specifically her second incarnation) borders on romantic attraction while being bolstered by her capacity to maintain pace with his mental processes. The largest proof of his influence on her is when she chooses to exile herself from Gallifrey to explore new worlds and help others, as he himself has done.

[edit] Appearance

Painting of Aristide Bruant by Lautrec, which inspired the Doctor's famous lookImposingly tall, with eyes that seem to constantly boggle, a mass of curls for hair and prominently displayed teeth, the Doctor favours an outfit that usually consists of a shirt, waistcoat, wide-legged trousers, a frock coat (with pockets containing a seemingly endless array of apparently useless items that would nevertheless suit the Doctor's purposes when used), a wide-brimmed hat (on occasion) and, most famously, his impractically long, multicoloured striped scarf, which was apparently knitted for him by Madame Nostradamus (whom he refers to as a "witty little knitter").

According to the creators of the show and Baker, the character's look was originally based on paintings and posters by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec of his friend, Aristide Bruant, a singer and nightclub owner whose trademark was a black cloak and long red scarf [3].

When John-Nathan Turner became the show's producer in Baker's last year, the Fourth Doctor was the first to sport an item of clothing adorned with red question marks as a motif, in this case above the points on his shirt collars. His coat and scarf were changed to a burgundy color scheme.

[edit] Story style

The Doctor occasionally adjusted his costume to fit his surroundings, as shown here in the Sherlock Holmes-inspired The Talons of Weng-ChiangThe early stories of the Fourth Doctor were characterised by a strong "horror" theme. The combination of writer Robert Holmes and producer Philip Hinchcliffe consciously took well known themes such as Frankenstein (The Brain of Morbius, Robot), transformation (The Ark in Space, Planet of Evil), alien abduction, and even some elements lifted directly from Universal horror movies, such as the mummies in Pyramids of Mars, although they were given a science fiction explanation, rather than the typical magic.

This horror element attracted much criticism, notably from Mary Whitehouse, and Hinchcliffe was moved on to police drama Target in 1977. The fourth season of Baker's run was produced by Graham Williams who was given specific instructions to lighten the tone of the stories, thus playing to Baker's strengths.

During the Fourth Doctor's run, in Season 17, the science fiction author Douglas Adams was script editor and his distinctive style can be seen in the dialogue and stories of some of the serials such as City of Death and The Pirate Planet. Adams' tenure is controversial with fans, some of whom believe that the humorous stories are uncharacteristic of the series, and others who contend that the diversity of the storytelling was one of the series' strong points.

In Season 18, John Nathan-Turner became the series' producer. He instituted a number of changes to the show, including toning down the humour. During this season, the Fourth Doctor became very much subdued and, on occasion, melancholy. At the time, Baker's health was temporarily impaired, although he eventually recovered. Both the actor and character seemed noticeably older in this season, due to Baker's gaunt appearance and greying hair; many of this season's stories also had an elegiac tone, with entropy and decay being a recurring theme.

The Fourth Doctor's stories saw fewer recurring elements than previously with few aliens and monsters appearing in more than one story. The Daleks only appeared twice and the Cybermen only had one story, Revenge of the Cybermen. UNIT, which had featured in most of the Third Doctor's adventures, only appeared in four early Fourth Doctor stories, playing a minor role in their last appearance, Season 13's The Seeds of Doom in which none of the regular UNIT staff appeared.

[edit] Other mentions
Visions of the Fourth Doctor appear in Earthshock, Mawdryn Undead, Resurrection of the Daleks and The Next Doctor.


[edit] Spoofs
The Fourth Doctor's distinctive appearance and manner have made him a target for affectionate parody. The character has appeared several times on The Simpsons and twice on Robot Chicken. Even once in "Hugo Whodunnit 2", a computer game where the player's character can save Tom Baker's doctor from a dalek and in return he gives you his infamous screwdriver. He is frequently impersonated by impressionist Jon Culshaw on the radio and television series Dead Ringers. (Culshaw also voiced the Doctor for the Big Finish audio The Kingmaker--see below.) Even Barney Miller had an episode featuring an eccentric man claiming to be a time-traveller, and wearing a long striped scarf. Archival footage of the Fourth Doctor's first title sequence was also used in the Family Guy episode "Blue Harvest" to represent (and parody) Star Wars hyperspace. Tom Baker, as the narrator of the series Little Britain, has referenced Doctor Who.
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 3:39 pm

The Fifth Doctor is the name given to the fifth incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. He was portrayed by actor Peter Davison.


[edit] Overview
After the famous and popular Fourth Doctor (as played by Tom Baker), the decision was taken for the next Doctor to be played by someone who presented something of a physical contrast to Baker and by an actor who was already firmly established in the British public's mind. Peter Davison was chosen, due in no small part to his popular and critically acclaimed role as Tristan Farnon in All Creatures Great and Small, a BBC series based on the books of James Herriot.

The Fifth Doctor's era was notable for a "back to basics" attitude, in which "silly" humour (and, to an extent, horror) was kept to a minimum, and more scientific accuracy was encouraged by the producer, John Nathan-Turner. It was also notable for the reintroduction of many of the Time Lord's enemies; such as the Master, Cybermen, Omega (a founding-father of Gallifrey), the Black and White Guardians, the Sea Devils, and the Silurians.

[edit] Biography
The Fourth Doctor's regeneration into the Fifth was a problematic one, and nearly failed, with the Doctor briefly taking on personality aspects from his four previous incarnations. After recovering in the fictional city Castrovalva, he continued his travels with Tegan Jovanka, Nyssa of Traken and Adric. After trips to the future and the past encountering villains such as Monarch and the Mara, the Fifth Doctor was confronted with tragedy when Adric died trying to stop a space freighter from crashing into prehistoric Earth (Earthshock).

When the Doctor met a new companion, an alien boy stranded on Earth by the name of Vislor Turlough, he did not know that Turlough had been commissioned by the Black Guardian to kill him. Soon after, Nyssa left to help cure Lazar's Disease on the space station Terminus. After meeting the entities known as Eternals racing in yacht-like spacecraft for the prize of "Enlightenment", Turlough broke free from the Black Guardian's influence, and continued to travel with the Doctor and Tegan. The Doctor met three of his previous incarnations when they were summoned to the Death Zone on Gallifrey by President Borusa, who was attempting to gain Rassilon's secret of immortality.

After further adventures in which the Doctor re-encountered old foes including the Silurians and the Sea Devils both Tegan and Turlough left the TARDIS. Tegan would find the death and violence they encountered on their travels too much to bear (Resurrection of the Daleks), and Turlough returned to his home planet of Trion in the company of his younger brother, as well as other exiles of Trion, from the planet Sarn (Planet of Fire).

Ultimately, the Fifth Doctor and his last companion Peri Brown were exposed to the drug spectrox in its deadly toxic raw form on Androzani Minor. With only one dose of the antidote available, he nobly sacrificed his own existence to save Peri, regenerating into the Sixth Doctor, expressing doubt for the first time that regeneration might be possible.

A sketch of the Fifth Doctor is seen in John Smith's book in the new series episode "Human Nature".


The Fifth Doctor meets the Tenth Doctor.Somewhere in his life (perhaps set after the events of Snakedance) he crashed his TARDIS into the TARDIS of the Tenth Doctor and consequently nearly opened a "Belgium sized" black hole because of the paradox caused. However the Tenth Doctor, remembering the event, knew how to stop it because he recalled watching himself correct the mistake when he was the Fifth Doctor. ("Time Crash")

A brief holographic clip of the Fifth Doctor appears in "The Next Doctor".

[edit] Personality
The Fifth Doctor was far more vulnerable, sensitive and reserved than his previous incarnations, and would often react to situations rather than initiate them. Frequently he would make decisions by flipping a coin. Unlike his more authoritative predecessors, he would treat his young companions as parts of a team, and would often willingly participate in situations under the leadership of someone else who had the strong command presence that he apparently lacked. However, the Fifth Doctor's boyish appearance, nervous energy and charm all hid the fact that he was a Time Lord of great age, compassion and experience.

This Doctor greatly abhorred violence and would often hesitate about taking matters into his own hands. For the first time indecision weighed seriously on the character, and it had its consequences - yet this Doctor was also one of the most courageous of his incarnations. He was willing to take chances with companions like Turlough and Kamelion, who were originally threats, even as he pretended (as was the case with Turlough) to be unaware of it at first in order to grant his companion the opportunity to do the right thing, under a careful watch of course. He was also willing to make enormous sacrifices (Mawdryn Undead) simply to keep his word and liberate others from suffering. It was perhaps the awful realisation that his very existence begat violence, and the weight of companion Adric's death on his conscience, and perhaps Tegan's near emotional breakdown as well, that led him to sacrifice his own existence to save his last companion, Peri. In an episode of Doctor Who Confidential, Steven Moffat said that "this doctor takes the emphasis off the eccentricities and turns it into a pained heroism of a man who is so much better than the universe he is trying to save but cannot bear to let it stand."

The Fifth Doctor was the last to use the original sonic screwdriver, which was destroyed during The Visitation, although the Seventh and subsequent Doctors were later seen using new versions of the tool. In Time Crash, he declined to borrow the Tenth Doctor's sonic screwdriver, prompting the Tenth Doctor's sarcastic remark, "Oh no, of course, you mostly went hands free didn't you? It's like, 'Hey I'm the Doctor, I can save the universe using a kettle and some string. And look at me, I'm wearing a vegetable.'"

[edit] Appearance
The Fifth Doctor's chosen mode of dress was a variation of an Edwardian cricketer's uniform, and he was even seen to carry a cricket ball in one of his pockets (which saved his life in one adventure). He wore a cream-coloured frock coat, striped trousers, plimsoll shoes and occasionally a pair of spectacles. The Tenth Doctor, who inherited various traits from this incarnation such as spectacle use, revealed in Time Crash that the spectacles weren't actually needed to aid the Doctor's eyesight but were just for show to make him look clever (perhaps to counter his youthful appearance). The Fifth Doctor's costume also retained red question marks embroidered onto the collar which producer John Nather-Turner added to the Fourth Doctor's costume in 1980. The Fifth Doctor also displayed an unusually acute sense of taste in Planet of Fire, also inherited by the Tenth Doctor.

On his lapel, this Doctor wore a celery stalk. He claimed in The Caves of Androzani that the celery would sometimes turn purple in the presence of certain gases in the "Praxis" range to which he was allergic, although this allergy was not mentioned by any incarnations before or since. He said that if that happened, he would then eat the celery (explaining, "If nothing else, I'm sure it's good for my teeth"). In the same story, while attempting to revive a feverish Peri from Spectrox Toxemia, he had noted that celery was an "excellent restorative from where I come from", but that the human olfactory system was "comparatively feeble." The Tenth Doctor repeatedly poked fun at the celery in Time Crash, describing it as a "decorative vegetable".

Peter Davison stated in an interview on the DVD of Castrovalva that he thought the clothes he wore were far too "designed" and that he would have still kept them, but wanted to add some individual flair to them, as other actors portraying the Doctor have done in the past.

[edit] Appearances
The Fifth Doctor was first seen on television in the last episode of Logopolis, broadcast on 21 March 1981. Davison played the role through the 19th and 20th seasons of Doctor Who, including the 20th anniversary special The Five Doctors. Patrick Troughton, who played the Second Doctor, advised Davison to stay in the role for three years, and acting on this advice Davison informed producer John Nathan-Turner that he would leave the role after the 21st season. In a break from recent tradition, Nathan-Turner decided to regenerate the Doctor in the season's penultimate story, in order to introduce the Sixth Doctor to audiences before the seasonal hiatus. Davison's last regular appearance as the Fifth Doctor was in the last episode of The Caves of Androzani, broadcast on 16 March 1984.

Davison returned to the role briefly in the 1993 charity special Dimensions in Time. Beginning in 1999, he recorded a series of Doctor Who audio plays for Big Finish Productions. In 2007, Davison, at the age of 56, appeared alongside Tenth Doctor David Tennant in a Doctor Who special for Children in Need, written by Steven Moffat and titled "Time Crash". This was the first official time that a Doctor from the New Series met a Doctor from the original 26-year run.[1] This is the first "multi-Doctor" story in the revived series and the first televised one since The Two Doctors in 1985.

The Fifth Doctor has also appeared in officially licensed novels, short stories and comics.

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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 3:42 pm

The Sixth Doctor is the name given to the sixth incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor, seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. He was portrayed by actor Colin Baker, and briefly by Sylvester McCoy during the Sixth Doctor's regeneration into the Seventh. This makes the Sixth Doctor one of only two incarnations of the Doctor to have been officially played by more than one actor, the other being the First Doctor.


[edit] Overview
The Sixth Doctor's brightly coloured, mismatched clothes and brash, overbearing personality set him apart from all his previous incarnations, in some ways hearkening back to the early irascibility and undertones of untrustworthiness of the First Doctor. The Sixth Doctor appeared in three seasons; however, in his first outing in Season 21 he appeared only in the final episode of The Caves of Androzani which featured the regeneration from the Fifth Doctor and thereafter in the following serial The Twin Dilemma to end that season. The Sixth Doctor's era is noted for the decision of the BBC controller Michael Grade to put the series on an 18-month hiatus between seasons 22 and 23, with only one new Doctor Who story, Slipback, made on radio during the hiatus, broadcast as 6 parts (at 10 minutes each) on BBC Radio 4 from 25 July to 8 August 1985, as part of a children's magazine show called Pirate Radio Four.

He also appeared in the special Dimensions in Time. There are also novels and audio plays featuring the Sixth Doctor. A glimpse of a sketch of the Sixth Doctor was later seen in John Smith's A Journal of Impossible Things in the revived third series episode "Human Nature". A brief holographic clip of the Sixth Doctor appears in "The Next Doctor".

[edit] Biography
The Sixth Doctor's regeneration was initially unstable, and he nearly strangled Peri before he came to his senses. He encountered many old foes including the Master, Daleks, Cybermen and Sontarans, and even shared an adventure with his own second incarnation. Later, the Doctor was put on trial for the second time by his own race, the Time Lords. The prosecutor at that trial, the Valeyard, turned out to be a possible future, and evil, incarnation of the Doctor himself. The events of the trial tangled the Doctor's timeline slightly, as he left in the company of Mel, whom he technically had not yet met. (Originally this was the then producers idea that in the following season this would be explained).

When the TARDIS was attacked by his old enemy the Rani, the Sixth Doctor was somehow injured and regenerated into the Seventh Doctor; the exact cause of the regeneration, however, has never been revealed on-screen.[1] When writers Pip and Jane Baker's novel of the story tried to explain the regeneration many were not happy with the outcome. There have subsequently been various explanations for the regeneration.

The Sixth Doctor is the first incarnation of the Doctor for which an estimate of length of his tenure can be extrapolated from the dialogue of the television series. In Revelation of the Daleks, he states that he is 900 years old; in Time and the Rani, the Seventh Doctor, having regenerated from the Sixth only hours earlier, states that his exact age is 953, indicating (presuming the Sixth Doctor gave his real age earlier) that 53 years had passed (for the Doctor) between Revelation of the Daleks and his regeneration (the exact length of time between The Twin Dilemma and Revelation of the Daleks, however, is not indicated). Given the convoluted circumstances surrounding Trial of a Time Lord, a suitable gap does exist for this. When the series returned in 2005, however, the Ninth Doctor also claimed an age of 900 years, and the Tenth Doctor 903, seemingly contradicting the earlier claim by the Seventh Doctor.

[edit] Personality
The Sixth Doctor was an unpredictable and somewhat petulant egoist, whose garish, multicoloured attire reflected his volatile personality. He was both portentous and eloquent — even for any Doctor, of whom he saw himself as the finest incarnation yet — and his unpredictability was made even wilder by his mood swings, manic behaviour, bombastic outbursts and glib, unflappable wit. His personality also displayed occasionally fatalistic overtones.

The Sixth Doctor was almost supremely confident in his abilities and did not suffer fools gladly; he sometimes seemed to endure Peri's presence far more than he actually appreciated it, and his superiority complex applied to almost everyone he encountered. His intellect could support his ego—for instance, the Sixth Doctor was the only one who was able to repair and operate the chameleon circuit within the TARDIS, allowing it to change shape to suit its surroundings rather than looking constantly like a police box (although the appropriateness of the TARDIS's appearance to its environment was more-or-less nil) in Attack of the Cybermen. However, not only did his melodramatic arrogance and caustic wit eventually subside, it actually hid the fact that he had a strong moral sense and a heart of gold (glimpsed in Revelation of the Daleks, in which he showed great compassion to a dying mutant). Underneath his blustering exterior, he was more determined than ever in his universal battles against evil, possessed of a tenacity and a thirst to do what was right that was far more visible than ever before. Despite his often unstable demeanour, he was always ready to act when necessary, and very little — even his companions — could hope to stand in his way.

His condescension towards the universe around him also extended to his companions, especially Peri. While his use of violence against his foes and his abrasive relationship with Peri were both often criticised by fans, the violence was largely in self-defence, and his relationship with Peri had mellowed significantly when the programme returned from hiatus for Season 23's The Trial of a Time Lord.

He was well known for his love of cats, and always wore one of a number of cat-shaped pins or brooches on the lapel of his patchwork coat, itself said to be the height of fashion on a distant planet.

The events surrounding the production of Doctor Who in the mid-1980s caused the Sixth Doctor's tenure to be cut short, and for a long time Colin Baker bore the brunt of the blame as the "unlikeable" Doctor.

The Sixth Doctor's return in the Big Finish Productions audio plays, voiced by Baker, have gone some way to changing this impression, with the Sixth Doctor appearing to be a somewhat calmer, wittier and altogether happier character (attributed in-story to the influence of companion Evelyn Smythe). In a 2001 poll in Doctor Who Magazine, Baker was voted the "greatest Doctor" of the audio plays.

[edit] Costume
Colin Baker wished to dress his Doctor in black, specifically black velvet, to reflect his character's darker personality. Producer John Nathan-Turner, however, opted for a deliberately tasteless costume with garish clashing colours (later described by Colin Baker as "an explosion in a rainbow factory"). He also retained the question marks embroidered onto his collar which Nathan-Turner had added to Tom Baker's costume in 1980 and had retained through Peter Davison's tenure. Baker added a cat badge to the ensemble.

In recent years, a blue variation of the costume has become a popular alternative. This outfit was used in the webcast Real Time as the clashing colours of the original design were tricky to animate.[1] It also has been used on the cover of some of numerous audio drama stories from Big Finish Productions. Ironically, one of the few requirements set down by the designer of the costume Baker wore in his televised stories was that it not feature any blue at all, as this would interfere with some of the series' special effects. [1]

[edit] Story style
Season 22 attracted some criticism for its violent content. Ironically, torture for entertainment was explored as a theme in the story Vengeance on Varos. After the 18-month hiatus, Season 23 featured a reduction of episodes produced, and the 14-part serial The Trial of a Time Lord was felt by some fans[2] to reflect the fact that the series itself was "on trial" at this time. The season featured some of the most popular Colin Baker serials (See History of Doctor Who for more details).
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 3:45 pm

The Seventh Doctor is a fictional character, the seventh incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. He was portrayed by the actor Sylvester McCoy.

Within the series' narrative, the Doctor is a centuries-old Time Lord alien from the planet Gallifrey who travels in time and space in his TARDIS, frequently with companions. When the Doctor is critically injured, he can regenerate his body; in doing so, his physical appearance and personality change. McCoy portrays the seventh such incarnation, a whimsical, thoughtful character who quickly becomes more layered, secretive and manipulative. His first companion was Melanie Bush (Bonnie Langford), a computer programmer who travelled with his previous self, and who is soon succeeded by troubled teenager and explosives expert Ace (Sophie Aldred), who becomes his protégé.



[edit] Overview
In his first season, the Seventh Doctor started out as a comical character, mixing his metaphors ("Time and tide melt the snowman," for example), playing the spoons, and making pratfalls, but soon started to develop a darker nature and raised the profound question of who the Doctor actually is. The Seventh Doctor era is noted for the cancellation of Doctor Who after 26 years. It is also noted for the Virgin New Adventures, a range of original novels published from 1992 to 1997, taking the series on beyond the television serials.

In 1990, readers of Doctor Who Magazine voted McCoy's Doctor "Best Doctor", over perennial favourite Tom Baker.

The Seventh Doctor's final appearance on television was in the 1996 Doctor Who television movie, where he regenerated into the Eighth Doctor, played by Paul McGann. A sketch of him is later seen in John Smith's A Journal of Impossible Things in the new series 2007 episode "Human Nature". A brief holographic clip of the Seventh Doctor appears in "The Next Doctor".

[edit] Biography
When the TARDIS was attacked by the Rani, the Sixth Doctor was injured and forced to regenerate. After a brief period of post-regenerative confusion and amnesia (chemically induced by the Rani), the Seventh Doctor thwarted the Rani's plans, and rejoined his companion Mel for whimsical adventures in an odd tower block and a Welsh holiday camp in the 1950s.

On the planet Svartos, Mel decided to leave the Doctor's company for that of intergalactic rogue Sabalom Glitz. Also at this time, the Doctor was joined by time-stranded teenager Ace. Although he did not mention it at the time, the Doctor soon recognised that an old enemy from a past adventure, the ancient entity known as Fenric, was responsible for the Time Storm which transported Ace from 1980s Perivale to Svartos in the distant future. Growing more secretive and driven from this point on, the Doctor took Ace under his wing and began teaching her about the universe, all the while keeping an eye out for Fenric's plot. The Doctor began taking a more scheming and proactive approach to defeating evil, using the Gallifreyan stellar manipulator named the Hand of Omega as part of an elaborate trap for the Daleks which resulted in the destruction of their home planet, Skaro. Soon afterwards, the Doctor used a similar tactic and another Time Lord relic to destroy a Cyberman fleet. He engineered the fall of the oppressive government of a future human colony in a single night and encountered the Gods of Ragnarok at a circus on the planet Segonax, whom he had apparently fought throughout time. Later, he was reunited with his old friend, Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart while battling the forces of an alternate dimension on Earth.

The Seventh Doctor's manipulations were not reserved for his enemies. With the goal of helping Ace confront her past, he took her to a Victorian house in her home town of Perivale in 1883 which she had burned down in 1983. Eventually, the Doctor confronted and defeated Fenric at a British naval base during World War II, revealing Fenric's part in Ace's history. The Doctor continued to act as Ace's mentor, returning her to Perivale; however, she chose to continue travelling with him. The circumstances of her parting from the Doctor were not shown on television.

Near the end of his incarnation, the Seventh Doctor was given the responsibility of transporting the remains of his former enemy the Master from Skaro to Gallifrey. This proved to be a huge mistake: despite having a limited physical form, the Master was able to take control of the Doctor's TARDIS and cause it to land in 1999 San Francisco, where the Doctor was shot in the middle of a gang shoot-out. He was taken to a hospital, where surgeons removed the bullets but mistook the Doctor's double heartbeat for fibrillation; their attempt to save his life instead caused the Doctor to "die" with one last shocking scream. Perhaps due to the anesthesia, the Doctor did not regenerate immediately after death (unlike all previous occasions); he finally did so several hours later, while lying in the hospital's morgue.

In Time and the Rani the Seventh Doctor gives his age soon after his regeneration as "exactly" 953 years, indicating that some two centuries of subjective time has passed since his fourth incarnation was revealed to be 759 in The Ribos Operation, and approximately half-a-century since Revelation of the Daleks in which the Sixth Doctor stated he was 900 years old. The later revival of the series, however, has contradicted the age given by the Seventh Doctor (and the Sixth) by establishing the Ninth Doctor as 900 years old, with the Tenth Doctor stating his exact age as 903 in Voyage of the Damned.

[edit] Personality
The Seventh Doctor displayed perhaps the most profound change in attitude of any of the Time Lord's personae, beginning as perhaps the most outwardly amiable and bumbling (to the extent of putting himself in danger but not at the cost of his overall great intelligence and benevolent intentions) and progressing into a driven, dark gamemaster whose plans to defeat his adversaries, both old and new, would play out across space and time. He generally displayed an affable, curious, knowledgeable, easygoing, excitable and charming air. However, as he began to choose his battles and keep a tighter grip on his secrets - from his plans to his very identity - he also presented more serious, contemplative, secretive, wistful and manipulative sides with undercurrents of mischief and authority, constantly giving the impression that there was more to him than met the eye.

As something of a showman, the Doctor would sometimes act like a buffoon, usually preferring to manipulate events from behind the scenes; much like his second incarnation, he was prepared to play the fool in order to trick his foes into underestimating him, inevitably leading to their defeat at his hands. He was an adept physical performer and once deployed a repertoire of magic tricks, illusions and escape artistry to this effect as part of his plans. Although his more obvious whimsical tendencies disappeared over time (particularly his spoons-playing), he maintained a fondness for idiosyncratic speeches that occasionally referred to literature, ordinary places and even food and drink amidst the weightier concerns on his mind. He was empathetic to his friends (and even his enemies, such as Helen A) and somewhat melancholic at times (such as during Mel's departure and before his decision to eradicate the Daleks) but now placed greater burdens upon himself in the name of protecting the universe. This may have led him to surround his true intentions in mystery and the use of sleight of hand as befit his fondness for performance, in effect, subverting his more lighthearted qualities to complement and enhance his heroic and darker ones.

Given the Seventh Doctor's appearance and stature, he was surprisingly capable of both directly and indirectly taking control of situations involving strangers, using his greater intelligence to assess and direct events. Concerned with the bigger picture, he would sometimes overlook the finer details and his planning, both pre-prepared and improvised, would sometimes have fatal results and consequences. When he acted to end threats, it was usually a ruthless, destructive and final maneuver. He was also not above hiding the truth from his friends and allies and using them in order to complete his schemes and gambits.

His tendency to reveal only select information to his companion Ace — as well as anyone else around them — was utilised both in her education and in their adventures, as if he were the only one who should know all the answers and others should come to their own conclusions. At two points he even abused Ace's trust in him, once to develop her as a person and again to keep her alive (on both occasions, freeing her from the evil influences that had haunted her during her life), while on one of these adventures, he showed great difficulty in admitting his foreknowledge of the situation's severity to her when she finally confronted him. In spite of his immense fondness for her, and her for him, he often frustrated her with his secretive nature as his alien behaviour, the great importance of his objectives (especially his focus on obliterating enemies from his past) and his strong desire to both educate and protect her would lead him to keep even her in the dark and would even subordinate her feelings towards him in order to succeed in their battles. Fortunately, their close, almost familial bond was likely what helped Ace in moving past the feelings of betrayal she sometimes felt towards the Doctor, particularly as he genuinely had her best interests at heart. In fact, while he appeared to be an unassuming figure, fond of performing magic tricks and displaying notable showmanship, the Seventh Doctor was actually quite powerful and calculating, for he would use his friends and foes alike as pawns in his elaborate chess game against "evil". As Ace herself put it, he was "well devious."

In direct contrast to his third incarnation, this Doctor was absolutely opposed to violence of any sort (as demonstrated in stories such as Battlefield, where he stops a battle merely by ordering the warriors to desist) and he was totally against the use of firearms (to the extent of 'talking down' a soldier ordered to execute him in The Happiness Patrol by emphasising the easiness of the kill versus the enormity of ending a life), although he also proved capable of rendering a man unconscious with a touch (Battlefield, Survival). In keeping with his established habits, he would use gadgetry of his own invention when the situation called for it, but never as his final gambit. Instead, he almost always managed to talk his enemies into submission, often into suicide – perhaps most memorably in Remembrance of the Daleks, where he taunts the seemingly last Dalek in existence until it self-destructs, or in Ghost Light, where he defeats the malevolent Light by ramming home the folly of trying to prevent evolution (he employs variations of this 'talk to death' tactic in Dragonfire, Silver Nemesis and The Curse of Fenric, although primarily to manipulate opponents to guarantee the outcome in his favour). Perhaps this Doctor's most definitive stand against violence and savagery was taken when he faced down his arch-foe the Master in Survival whilst resisting the animalistic influence of an alien world, telling his enemy, "IF WE FIGHT LIKE ANIMALS, WE'LL DIE LIKE ANIMALS!"

It is indeed fitting that this, at times the darkest Doctor of all, should not directly use physical force to implement his actions, even though he seemed to have the universe's weight on his shoulders more often than any other Doctor.

[edit] Appearance and personality quirks
The Doctor's outfit in this incarnation was calmer than his previous attire ("Thank goodness in this regeneration I've regained my impeccable sense of haute couture" - Time and the Rani), but as idiosyncratic as any other. It consisted of a off-white safari-styled jacket with a red paisley scarf worn under its lapels and a matching handkerchief in the left pocket, a fob watch chained to the left lapel, a plain white shirt, a red paisley tie, a yellow fair isle-inspired pullover adorned with red question marks and blue-green zigzag patterns, sand-coloured tweed plaid trousers, white/brown brogued spectator shoes, a white colonial-styled Panama hat with a paisley hatband and an upturned brim (a possible reference to the similar accessory he wore as the Fifth Doctor) and an umbrella with a red question mark-shaped handle (though early Season 24 episodes see him either without an umbrella, or with one with a bamboo handle). As with the three other Doctors costumed during the John Nathan-Turner era, the above mentioned question marks on the Doctor's pullover and his umbrella handle continued the red question marked clothing motif that was introduced in the Fourth Doctor's final season and ended before the Seventh Doctor's regeneration.

Although a seemingly casual outfit that reflected the Seventh Doctor's initially easy and whimsical manner, it took on a new light when he became more scheming and prepared in his missions — to reflect the emergence of his personality's more mysterious and darker aspects, his jacket, hatband, handkerchief, scarf and tie became more muted and darker in colour, now in shades of burgundy and brown (most obviously the jacket). In the New Adventures novels, images of the Doctor on the covers usually omitted the pullover and eventually depicted him in a cream single breasted suit. On a DVD featurette ("Light In Dark Places") for Ghost Light, Sylvester McCoy expresses some disdain for the garment, feeling it detracts somewhat from the mood of the story, when drawing attention to the stylistic choice of performing in most of the serial without his hat and umbrella. The changes in colours make the Seventh the only Doctor under Nathan-Turner's tenure to greatly alter his costume; the changes to the outfits worn by his three previous selves during this production period tended to be more subtle and less noteworthy. The Seventh's own attire was repeatedly revised during his first season, initially including a red/black tartan scarf and red braces, along with the bamboo-handle umbrella.


The Seventh Doctor's TV Movie costume.In the TV Movie the Doctor's costume changed again, with a return to a lighter jacket, now a light brown tweed. Gone were the question mark pullover, scarves, paisley tie and question mark umbrella, replaced by a red waistcoat and a brown/black zig zag pattern tie. However, the Doctor retained his Panama hat.

The Doctor enjoyed using his hat, umbrella and the TARDIS key, amongst other items, as physical props, usually as showy affectations or to command attention, while the umbrella could also be used to disarm and trip foes(Paradise Towers, Battlefield, Ghost Light, Survival). Like most of his previous selves, the Seventh carried any number of random items in his pockets, including technological devices and books (Dragonfire, Ghost Light). In a break from his past however, he spoke with a mild Scottish accent rather than in his past selves' Received Pronunciation speaking patterns and also rolled his Rs.

This Doctor also displays strange and 'alien' characteristics playing with the perception of his senses, as he smells an apple and listens to cheese in Survival. He also displayed a talent for hypnosis on various occasions that appeared to be much stronger than in past incarnations (Battlefield). The Greatest Show in the Galaxy shows him to be a capable entertainer, performing a variety of well known magic tricks. In Ghost Light, he reveals his pet peeves to be burnt toast, bus stations, unrequited love, tyranny and cruelty.

[edit] Story style
In Season 24, the Seventh Doctor era began with a light-hearted approach, with stories like Delta and the Bannermen clearly aimed at a younger audience. However, in the final two seasons with Andrew Cartmel as script editor, the stories soon explored the true nature of the Doctor, hinting at dark secrets in his past. In Silver Nemesis, Lady Peinforte hints she knows the Doctor's secret of being more than just a Time Lord (deleted scenes in Remembrance of the Daleks and Survival also refer to this). Remembrance has the Doctor use "we" when referring to early Gallifreyan time travel experiments. Ace also became the focus of a dedicated character arc that was seeded from her introduction onwards and prominently played out during Season 26.

With the cancellation of the series, these developments were never fully played out in the television series, but some of them were revealed in the New Adventures.

Marc Platt's novel Lungbarrow is usually considered to be the conclusion of the "Cartmel Masterplan". In that novel, the Doctor is revealed to be the reincarnation of "the Other", a shadowy figure and contemporary of Rassilon and Omega from Ancient Gallifrey. Lungbarrow was originally intended for Season 26, but producer John Nathan-Turner felt that it revealed too much of the Doctor's origins. It was reworked to become Ghost Light instead.


[edit] Television
The Seventh Doctor and Ace appeared twice on television between the time Doctor Who was cancelled and the 1996 television movie. The first was in 1990, in a special episode of the BBC2 educational programme Search Out Science. In this episode, the Doctor acted as a quiz show host, asking questions about astronomy; Ace, K-9 and "Cedric, from the planet Glurk" were the contestants. The Seventh Doctor then appeared in the 1993 charity special Dimensions in Time. Neither of these appearances are generally considered canonical. A picture of the Seventh Doctor appears briefly in the Tenth Doctor story "Human Nature", in John Smith's "A Journal Of Impossible Things," and a video of him appears briefly in the Tenth Doctor Christmas Special "The Next Doctor" .
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 3:49 pm

The Eighth Doctor is a fictional character, the eighth incarnation of the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. He was portrayed by Paul McGann. Though he appeared in only one TV feature, his adventures are extensively portrayed in other media.

Within the series' narrative, the Doctor is a centuries-old alien, a Time Lord from the planet Gallifrey, who travels in time in his TARDIS, frequently with companions. When the Doctor is critically injured, he can regenerate his body but in doing so gains a new physical appearance and with it, a distinct new personality. McGann portrays the eighth such incarnation, a passionate, enthusiastic and eccentric character. His only companion in the television movie is Grace (Daphne Ashbrook), a medical doctor whose surgery is responsible for triggering his regeneration. In the continued adventures of the character depicted in audio dramas, novels and comic books he travels alongside numerous other companions, including self styled "Edwardian Adventuress" Charley, the alien Destrii and present-day humans Lucie and Sam.

[edit] Overview
The Eighth Doctor made his first and only television appearance in the 1996 Doctor Who television movie, the first time the Doctor had returned to television screens since the end of the original series in 1989. Intended as a backdoor pilot for a new television series on the FOX Network, the movie was inadequately marketed and advertised[citation needed] (and in some markets even pre-empted by televised sporting events), ultimately leading to poor US ratings. In the UK, however, it was received well, attracting over 9 million viewers and generally positive reviews. It was also generally well received in Australia.[1]

Although the movie failed to spark a new television series, the Eighth Doctor's adventures continued in various licensed spin-off media, notably BBC Books' Eighth Doctor Adventures novels, audio plays from Big Finish Productions, and the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip. As these stories spanned the nine years between 1996 and the debut of the new television series in 2005, some consider the Eighth Doctor one of the longest-serving of the Doctors. He is unarguably the longest-serving Doctor in the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip. In the wake of the positive reaction to the revived television series in 2005, several of the Eighth Doctor's Big Finish audio dramas were also broadcast on BBC7 radio in an edited form. The trailers for these broadcasts explained that these adventures took place before the destruction of Gallifrey as described in the revived TV series. In 2007, the BBC7 aired a new series of Eighth Doctor audio adventures, created specifically for radio broadcast. Paul McGann has continued to portray the Eighth Doctor in the various audio spinoffs.

The canonicity of the spin-off media with respect to the television series and to each other is open to interpretation (the "Beginner's Guide to Doctor Who" on the BBC's classic Doctor Who website suggests this may be due to the Time War)[2]. It has been suggested that the Eighth Doctor's adventures in three different forms (novels, audio, and comics) take place in three separate continuities. The discontinuities were made explicit in the audio drama Zagreus.[3]In response, it has become increasingly common to consider the three ranges separately. The final Eighth Doctor Adventures novel, The Gallifrey Chronicles, obliquely references this split in timelines, even suggesting that the split results in the three alternative forms of the Ninth Doctor (a reference to the fact three different versions of the incarnation have appeared in various media). Even so, all matters of canonicity remain typically unclear.


The Eighth Doctor's "appearance" in "Human Nature".Despite (or perhaps because of) the fact the Eighth Doctor appeared on television only once, he is the most prolific of all the Doctors (to date) in terms of number of individual stories – published in novel, novella, short story and audio form.[4] Literature aside, counting his performances in the role – all but one being audio-only – McGann is easily as prolific as many of his fellow Doctor Who stars. In 2007, the Eighth Doctor finally made a second appearance (of sorts) within the television series' continuity. In the episode "Human Nature" he appears on-screen as a sketch (alongside other incarnations) in the book A Journal of Impossible Things by John Smith. In 2008 he appeared again as a brief image in "The Next Doctor".

[edit] Personality
The Eighth Doctor, a Byronesque figure who is arguably the most human and romantic of all of his incarnations, encouraged those around him to seize life instead of withdrawing from it. He also seemed to enjoy giving people hints of their own futures, probably to prod them into making the right decisions. It is unclear if the eighth Doctor's knowledge of people's futures comes from historical expertise, psychic power or precognitive ability.

As with the Fifth Doctor, the debonair Eighth Doctor's youthful, wide-eyed enthusiasm actually hid a very old soul with perhaps a darker side. In fact, whereas the Eighth Doctor of the audio plays (voiced by McGann) and the comic strip hew closely to the television movie Doctor, the Eighth Doctor of the novels exhibited what was, at times, a much darker personality, perhaps due to the rather traumatic adventures that he underwent.

The Eighth Doctor also attracted controversy in the television movie, breaking the long-standing taboo against romantic involvement with his companions by kissing Grace Holloway. Fans were extremely divided on this. In the spin-off media that followed, the Eighth Doctor has often been the object of romantic interest, but has shown little to no romantic inclinations of his own.

Fans have also been divided on the Eighth Doctor revealing that he is apparently half-human on his mother's side. See Doctor Who (1996)#Controversy for more details. However, "Journey's End", an episode of the revived television series, sees the Tenth Doctor become half-human, and his reaction to the situation implies this is a new experience for him.

In all his iterations, the Eighth Doctor has proven extremely prone to bouts of amnesia, a tendency apparently inspired by the plot of his sole television appearance. He also demonstrates, in his first and only televised appearance, a penchant for sleight of hand. He manages to "lift" or pickpocket various items from certain people he meets during his first adventure.


[edit] Television
After the Seventh Doctor was caught in the crossfire of a gang shoot-out in 1999 San Francisco he was taken to a hospital where surgeons, confused by his double heartbeat, attempted to correct a non-existent fibrillation. Their efforts instead "killed" the Doctor, triggering a regeneration into his eighth incarnation. At the time of his injury, the Doctor had been transporting the remains of his long-time nemesis the Master from the planet Skaro to Gallifrey. (Although it's interesting to note that in Remembrance of the Daleks, featuring the Seventh Doctor, Skaro was destroyed by the Hand of Omega). The Master, however, was not completely dead, and was able to possess a human form. In an attempt to steal the Doctor's remaining lives, the Master opened the Eye of Harmony within the TARDIS, and nearly destroyed the planet Earth as people celebrated the end of the millennium. However, with the aid of Dr Grace Holloway, the Doctor was able to stop the Master's plan; the Master was sucked into the Eye, apparently dying once and for all. The Master would, however, return in "Utopia".

The exact circumstances of the Eighth Doctor's regeneration into the Ninth have not yet been revealed. An off-hand remark by the Ninth Doctor in the 2005 episode "Rose" (commenting on the size of his own ears) suggests that the regeneration took place shortly before that story.
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 3:51 pm

The Ninth Doctor is the ninth official incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor, in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who.

"Unofficial" Ninth Doctors include the Ninth Doctor played by Rowan Atkinson in the charity parody Doctor Who and the Curse of Fatal Death and the Ninth Doctor voiced by Richard E. Grant in the animated webcast Scream of the Shalka (to avoid confusion with Eccleston's incarnation Grant's Doctor is referred to as the Shalka Doctor by fans). This article is about the official Ninth Doctor, played by the actor Christopher Eccleston, whose tenure as the Doctor made up series 1 of the revived programme in 2005.

Within the series' narrative, the Doctor is a centuries-old alien, a Time Lord from the planet Gallifrey, who travels in time in his TARDIS, frequently with companions. When the Doctor is critically injured, he can regenerate his body but in doing so gains a new physical appearance and with it, a distinct new personality. Eccleston portrays the ninth such incarnation, a brooding and melancholic war survivor after a Time War in which he wiped out both his race and the enemy Daleks. His first companion is Rose (Billie Piper), whom he plucks from obscurity on the planet Earth and to whom he grows increasingly attached. Eccleston's Doctor also travels briefly with unruly boy-genius Adam (Bruno Langley) and with 51st century con man and former 'Time Agent' Captain Jack Harkness (John Barrowman).

[edit] Overview
The original Doctor Who television series ceased production in 1989 with the Seventh Doctor. Paul McGann, as the Eighth Doctor, appeared in the role just once on screen in the Doctor Who television movie in 1996. The appearance of the Ninth Doctor marked the regular return of the character to television screens after nearly sixteen years, and as a result for many young fans and new viewers he was the first Doctor they had ever seen. He was introduced without any information on his recent past; though it is implied in "Rose" that he may have recently regenerated, the exact circumstances of that change, or what caused it, are unknown.

[edit] Plot details
The Ninth Doctor is (to the best of his knowledge) the only survivor of the Time War. It is unspecified whether it was this incarnation of the Doctor or the previous who fought in the war, though popular continuity argues that it was the events of the Time War that caused the Eighth Doctor's regeneration into the Ninth.

After his regeneration, he helped save London from an invasion by the Autons, living plastic automatons animated by the Nestene Consciousness. He did this with the help of Rose Tyler, a teenager whom he subsequently invited to be a companion in his travels. The Doctor showed Rose the far future and Victorian Britain (specifically Cardiff, where a space-time rift was revealed to be situated) before returning to Rose's own era, where they fought off an attempt to destroy the Earth by the alien Slitheen family. When they journeyed to Utah in 2012, the Doctor found that a single Dalek was being kept in a secret museum filled with alien artifacts. There, the first details of the Time War fought by the Time Lords and Daleks were revealed, and how it concluded with the mutual annihilation of both races, leaving the Doctor the last of the Time Lords. A young man named Adam Mitchell travelled with them from Utah.

The Doctor, Rose, and Adam travelled to the future to Satellite 5, where they discovered a plot by the Jagrafess to manipulate Earth through its mass media. When Adam tried to smuggle future knowledge back to his own time, he became the first companion to be deliberately expelled from the TARDIS. After this, Rose persuaded the Doctor to return to the day her father, Pete Tyler, died, creating a temporal paradox by saving him, which nearly led to disaster until Pete sacrificed himself to set time right once more.

Following a mysterious spaceship to wartime London in 1941, the Doctor and Rose met Captain Jack Harkness, a confidence trickster and former Time Agent from the 51st century. Jack's latest con nearly caused a deadly nanotechnological plague to sweep through the human race, but he helped the Doctor and Rose end it prior to joining the TARDIS crew.

Going back to Cardiff to refuel the TARDIS from the rift, the Doctor, Rose and Jack found that one of the Slitheen had survived, posing as Margaret Blaine, the city's mayor. Blaine was exposed to the heart of the TARDIS, and was regressed into an egg. It was during this episode that the Doctor first noticed that he and Rose had kept coming across the words "Bad Wolf".

At some point, the Ninth Doctor had at least three unchronicled adventures, involving the sinking of the RMS Titanic, the assassination of John F. Kennedy in 1963, and the eruption of Krakatoa in the 19th Century. These are revealed in "Rose", but their placement in the Ninth Doctor's chronology remains unknown. In "The Unquiet Dead", he also mentions that he "saw the Fall of Troy; World War Five [and] pushed boxes at the Boston Tea Party" but other than the first instance, when he was the First Doctor, it is unclear whether these were in his personal timeline or that of his past incarnations. He also shared an adventure with Jack and Rose in feudal Japan immediately prior to the events of the penultimate episode, "Bad Wolf".

However, the first of these adventures may actually have taken place immediately after his regeneration, since he is shown in a photo (taken in Southampton in 1912) to be wearing period clothes (Eccleston was dressed and shot specially) which resemble those worn by the Eighth Doctor. The Ninth Doctor refuses to make any concessions to contemporary fashion elsewhere in his travels (though he later insists that Rose dress appropriately for the Victorian era), being very precise about his look, which is deliberately most unlike that worn by any previous incarnations. Also, it is strongly implied that he saved the family pictured with him, by dissuading them from boarding the doomed ship — and, one episode later, he reveals that he himself was on board, and ended up clinging to an iceberg.

When the Doctor and his companions became caught in a series of deadly versions of 20th Century gameshows, they found themselves at the mercy of the Bad Wolf Corporation, based on Satellite Five, but a full century after their last visit. However, the true enemy was soon revealed to be the Daleks. The Dalek Emperor had survived the Time War, and had rebuilt the Dalek race. The Doctor sent Rose back to her own time in the TARDIS, before attempting to destroy the Dalek army. In doing so, he would have been forced to destroy a great part of the human race, which he ultimately finds himself incapable of doing. Meanwhile, after seeing more "Bad Wolf" graffiti, Rose realised it was somehow a message linking her to the events in the future.

Managing to open up the heart of the TARDIS, she absorbed the energies of the time vortex, and used it to destroy the Daleks. In order to save Rose from being consumed from within by those energies, the Doctor absorbed the fatal energy himself. However, the damage to his cells caused him to regenerate into the Tenth Doctor. He regenerates while still standing, warning Rose to keep away. His last words are, "Rose, before I go I just wanna tell you — you were fantastic...absolutely fantastic...and d'you know what? So was I!"

[edit] Companions

The companions of the Ninth Doctor. Rose Tyler, Adam Mitchell and Captain Jack Harkness.The Ninth Doctor had three on-screen companions during his tenure, the main one being Rose Tyler, who appears in all 13 episodes of Series 1. Adam Mitchell joined the Doctor on his travels at the conclusion of "Dalek" after the Doctor indulged Rose's prodding to let Adam "see the stars" and was rejected by the Doctor after his actions in "The Long Game". Jack Harkness first appeared in "The Empty Child" and joined the TARDIS crew in "The Doctor Dances". In the last episode of the first season, "The Parting of the Ways", Jack is killed by the Daleks but then resurrected by the time-vortex empowered Rose, although the Doctor leaves without him after the battle. He later briefly rejoins the TARDIS crew in the Tenth Doctor story "Utopia" (in which the reasons for the Doctor abandoning him in Parting of the Ways are revealed), and also starred in the spin-off series Torchwood.

On two occasions, the Ninth Doctor invited other people to join him on his adventures but was unsuccessful in having them travel in his TARDIS. Mickey Smith declined when invited (though he would later agree to travel with the Tenth Doctor) and in "The Parting of the Ways", a woman named Lynda Moss accepted the Doctor's invitation but was killed by Daleks before she could travel with him.

The Ninth Doctor's relationship with Rose verged on the romantic, with both of them clearly showing that they cared about each other deeply, although both always denied that they were a couple. On some level, the Doctor's sudden presence in her life fulfilled Rose's need for a strong male figure, having grown up without her father and boyfriend Mickey Smith often proving inadequate in regards to his strength of character. In turn, the Doctor, having undergone the trials of the Time War and still affected by his many losses incurred during the war, found himself encouraged by Rose's resolve, curiosity and compassion. The lone Dalek in "Dalek", having absorbed Rose's DNA, taunted the Doctor by referring to her as "the woman you [the Doctor] love", but the Doctor did not respond. The Ninth Doctor did kiss Rose with some passion in "The Parting of the Ways", although it could be argued that this only was in order to draw out the lethal energy of the time vortex from her body. (See "The Doctor and romance".)

[edit] Personality
As a character, the Ninth Doctor is less of a central heroic figure than an enabler, encouraging his companions and other people he meets to act upon their more positive impulses. Those he meets (in particular Captain Jack Harkness) often credit him with making them better people (this is indirectly referenced in the penultimate episode of Series 3 when the Master calls the Doctor "the man who makes people better"). He uses this quality alongside his intelligence and the information he gathers to inspire and allow others to act to end the dangers they face, rarely taking direct action himself (although he tended to find himself incapacitated in some manner at crucial moments, therefore requiring the interventions of others).

The Doctor's ninth incarnation was perhaps the most gritty, and informal, masking a lonely, guilt-ridden and melancholic personality with a jovial, witty, forthright and almost manic exterior. Similar to the Fourth Doctor, he would often make jokes in the face of danger, but then become grim and serious when on his own. Like the Sixth Doctor, he also tended to be fatalistic at times, to the point of near-panic when he and Rose were cornered in "The Unquiet Dead" and he realised that he was going to die (this despite the knowledge that he would probably just regenerate). Despite being impatient with humans, whom he often referred to as "stupid apes" -- and Mickey receiving particular scorn and being dubbed "Mickey the Idiot" -- the Ninth Doctor was far more tactile with, and reliant upon, his human companions than previous incarnations. He was notably both sentimental and emotional, especially where his closest friend, Rose, was concerned, to the point of allowing her to view her parents' wedding and later, her father's last moments — this being just one example of his occasional lack of caution.

The Ninth Doctor was quite colloquial in his language and spoke with a distinctly Northern accent. Although the Seventh and Eighth Doctor spoke with non-Received Pronunciation accents, the Ninth's era was the first time this was commented on in the series. When Rose questioned him on why, if he was alien, he sounded like he was from the North, the Doctor retorted, "Lots of planets have a North!"

Much of the Ninth Doctor's melancholy, lack of patience, levels of inaction and hard-bitten edge could be attributed to feelings of guilt at being the sole survivor of the Last Great Time War between the Time Lords and the Daleks, the conclusion of which apparently resulted from his own actions to end the Dalek threat, burning away 10 million of their ships and destroying Gallifrey and his own race in the process. This darker side came to the fore when he encountered the lone Dalek in "Dalek", exhibiting an angry, merciless and vengeful streak which surprised even Rose and led to the Dalek commenting that the Doctor would make a good Dalek. Previously, echoing the ruthlessness of his seventh self, he also impassively stood by as the villainous Lady Cassandra exploded, viewing it a fitting end for her actions (it was left ambiguous as to whether he could have spared her). However, a more light-hearted enthusiasm would surface on occasion, sometimes finding manic delight in tense situations such as his meeting with Charles Dickens (of whom he is a well-versed fan) whilst pursuing a kidnapped Rose. He also displayed a wide pop-cultural knowledge ranging from Dickens to 21st century celebrity gossip, while his joy on saving the victims of the nanogene attack in 1940s London, thus totally avoiding fatalities, restored some of his optimism and self-belief. Ultimately, the Doctor was able to put some of his demons to rest and seemed to find some peace through redemption towards the end of his incarnation. This redemption occurred shortly before his regeneration when he was given the opportunity to vanquish the Dalek fleet once more, but at the cost of the human race. He decided not to do it. When the Dalek Emperor asked if he would rather be a coward or killer, the Doctor merely responded, "Coward. Any day."

In contrast with his successor and in common with his third, fourth and sixth selves, the Ninth Doctor did not shy away from using force in situations he would deem necessary. In "Dalek", he located an alien weapon for use on the last Dalek in existence; were it not for Rose's intervention, he would have used it. In "Bad Wolf", he and his companions escaped from the custody of the Gamestation's armed guards using physical force, with the Doctor throwing a guard against a wall. Later, as he proceeded to the station's control room, he wielded a heavy two-handed weapon, even deactivating the safety as if he was going to use it. However, as he speaks to the controller, he reveals that he had no actual intention of shooting anybody. The Doctor also arranged for lethal weaponry to be used on the Slitheen in "World War Three", sending a missile to destroy the alien family before they could nuke the world.

On several occasions, the Doctor indicates that he is 900 years old, the same age as the Sixth Doctor claimed to be in Revelation of the Daleks. This appears to contradict the original series in which the Seventh Doctor, following his regeneration in Time and the Rani, claimed to be 953 years of age, and who was in turn followed by the Eighth Doctor. To date this discrepancy has yet to be addressed on-screen. (See The Doctor's age.)

The Ninth Doctor's catchphrase, used in a variety of manners, and sometimes ironically, was "Fantastic!" (In 2007, Eccleston joined the cast of the American series Heroes; in the episode "The Fix", Eccleston's character Claude utters "Fantastic!" in the same occasionally ironic fashion as the Ninth Doctor.)

[edit] Gadgets
The Ninth Doctor's era saw the introduction of a redesigned sonic screwdriver which was more versatile than its earlier versions, with functions ranging from its usual door opening abilities to conducting medical scans, repairing barbed wire and acting as a remote control for the TARDIS. The TARDIS console room also underwent a radical redesign, with an amber and green motif and a more organic look to its components.

The Ninth Doctor was also in the habit of using "slightly" psychic paper — that appeared to be a blank piece of card that had the ability to show the viewer anything that the user wanted them to see. The Doctor used this to fake various means of identification. Jack Harkness also used psychic paper in his capacity as a con man.

The Ninth Doctor modified Rose's mobile phone — which she dubbed the "superphone" — to give it the ability not just to receive and transmit where ordinary signals would not get through, but powerful enough to be able to make telephone calls to any point in time (even calibrating to the time period of the user).

[edit] Story style
Under producer Russell T Davies, the new series had a faster pace than those of the classic series. Rather than four- to six-part serials of 25-minute episodes (the most common format of the original series), most of the Ninth Doctor's stories consisted of individual 45-minute episodes, with only three stories out of ten being two-parters. The thirteen episodes were, however, loosely connected in a series-long story arc which brought their disparate threads together in the series finale. Also, like the original series, stories often flowed directly into one another or were linked together in some way. Notably, in common only with seasons 7 and 26 of the original series, every story of the season took place on or near Earth. This fact is directly addressed in the original novel The Monsters Inside, in which Rose and the Doctor joke about the fact that all their adventures to date have taken place on Earth or on neighbouring space stations.

The stories of Series 1 varied quite significantly in tone, with the production team showcasing the various genres inhabited by Doctor Who over the years. Examples include the "pseudo-historical" story "The Unquiet Dead"; the far-future whodunnit of "The End of the World"; Earthbound alien invasion stories in "Rose" and "Aliens of London"/"World War Three"; "base under siege" in "Dalek" and horror in "The Empty Child". Even the spin-off media were represented, with "Dalek" taking elements from writer Rob Shearman's own audio play Jubilee and the emotional content of Paul Cornell's "Father's Day" drawing on the tone of Cornell's novels in the Virgin New Adventures line. Davies had asked both Shearman and Cornell to write their scripts with those respective styles in mind. The episode "Boom Town" included a reference to the novel The Monsters Inside, becoming the first episode to acknowledge (albeit in a subtle way) spin-off fiction.

[edit] Regeneration
As noted above, when television audiences first see the Ninth Doctor, it has been an unspecified time since his regeneration, making this one of the few Doctors (the others are the First and Third) whose "birth" has not been shown on screen. However, according to the essay "Flood Barriers" in the 2007 Panini Books reprint collection of Eighth Doctor comic strips from Doctor Who Magazine, strip editor Clayton Hickman reveals that Russell T Davies had authorised the comic strip to depict the regeneration at the end of the story arc, The Flood. The Eighth Doctor would be shown regenerating after being exposed to the Time Vortex and briefly receiving god-like powers in order to stop an invasion of Earth by the Cybermen (similar to Rose's exposure at the end of "The Parting of the Ways" to stop the Daleks). The regeneration would have been witnessed by the Eighth Doctor's companion, Destrii, and Hickman writes that the intent was to continue with a Ninth Doctor: Year One story arc with the Ninth Doctor and Destrii. However, when this arc was vetoed by both Russell T Davies and series producer Julie Gardner, the creative team were unable to come up with another way of regenerating the Doctor without Destrii's presence, and so the decision was made not to depict the regeneration in the comic strip. The reprint collection includes a specially-drawn panel showing how the Ninth Doctor might have looked in the comic strip immediately after his regeneration, wearing the Eighth Doctor's costume and being tended to by Destrii.[1] The Flood concludes with a homage to the ending of Survival, with the Eighth Doctor noting that there is more to explore in the universe with his companion, and muses on acquiring a leather jacket to replace the coat he has lost, implying that the Eighth Doctor eventually dons the Ninth's garb prior to the Time War.

While the Eight Doctor's Regeneration into the Ninth Doctor is never shown or mentioned, it is implied in the episode "Rose (Doctor Who)" that it did not occur long before that episode, as the Doctor examines himself in the mirror and appears mildly surprised by his appearance.

The Ninth Doctor also appears on-screen as a sketch (alongside other incarnations) in the book A Journal of Impossible Things by John Smith. A brief holographic clip of him appears in "The Next Doctor".

The Ninth Doctor is also vaguely referenced at the end of "Journey's End", where the Tenth Doctor, about to leave Rose behind with the half-human clone of himself spawned in the episode, refers to the clone's more violent and impetuous personality as being akin to how he was when he and Rose first met, also believing that - as she did during his ninth incarnation - she would be able to help make the clone a better man.
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 3:54 pm

The Tenth Doctor is the tenth incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. He is played by David Tennant, who replaced Christopher Eccleston's Ninth Doctor in the 2005 series finale, "The Parting of the Ways". Tennant has appeared in three series to date, as well as four seasonal specials. As with previous incarnations of the Doctor, the character has also appeared in other Doctor Who multimedia.

In the series' narrative, the Doctor is a centuries-old Time Lord alien from the planet Gallifrey who travels in time in his TARDIS, frequently with companions. When the Doctor is critically injured, he can regenerate his body; in doing so, his physical appearance and personality change. Tennant portrays the tenth such incarnation. His first companion was Rose Tyler (Billie Piper), who was already travelling with his predecessor. Rose fell in love with the new Doctor, but the two were separated seemingly indefinitely. Subsequently, the Doctor travelled with other companions, including Martha Jones (Freema Agyeman) and Donna Noble (Catherine Tate), but eventually parted ways with them all by the end of the 2008 series finale, "Journey's End".

David Tennant has announced during the acceptance of a National Television Award for his role as the Tenth Doctor that he will not return in this role for the fifth series, currently scheduled to be broadcast in 2010. He will make his final appearance in the role in the last of the television specials that are scheduled to be aired in 2009 and early 2010.[1]



[edit] Overview
After the successful premiere of "Rose" and announcement of a second series being commissioned by the BBC, the story broke that Christopher Eccleston, who played the Ninth Doctor, would not be returning for the second series. On 16 April 2005, the BBC announced that David Tennant had been selected for the role of the Tenth Doctor.[6] His first appearance in the series was for 20 seconds following the Ninth Doctor's regeneration at the end of "The Parting of the Ways". His first full episode as the Doctor, barring an appearance in a "mini-episode" during the 2005 Children in Need show, was the 2005 Christmas Special, "The Christmas Invasion". He then appeared in the 2006 series, the second seasonal episode, the 2007 series, the third Christmas special and the 2008 series. It has also been confirmed that Tennant will appear in four specials to be aired throughout 2009.[7]

In 2006, readers of Doctor Who Magazine voted Tennant's Doctor "Best Doctor" over perennial favourite Tom Baker.[8]

A thirteen-part animated adventure, The Infinite Quest, featuring the Tenth Doctor and companion Martha Jones (voiced by David Tennant and Freema Agyeman) premiered on Totally Doctor Who on 2 April 2007; the last segment of The Infinite Quest was shown with all previous episodes as an entire Doctor Who episode on 30 June 2007. The Tenth Doctor will also appear in a second animated serial, Dreamland, planned to air on CBBC in Autumn 2009.[9]

While the previous Doctor was never explicitly referred to as the Ninth on-screen, the exact number of incarnations thus far was confirmed in-series by sketches of the ten Doctors to date in the sketchbook A Journal of Impossible Things that appeared in 2007's "Human Nature" (although only five incarnations are visible on-screen, the other five also appear on a two-page scan seen on the BBC's tie-in website). In "School Reunion", the Tenth Doctor commented to Sarah Jane Smith that he had regenerated half a dozen times since they had last met; Sarah last saw the Doctor at the end of the Fourth Doctor serial The Hand of Fear (in the anniversary special "The Five Doctors" (1983), she is paired up with the Third Doctor, and also meets the Fifth Doctor, Second Doctor, and First Doctor). Off-screen, on the DVD commentary for "The Parting of the Ways", Julie Gardner states after the regeneration sequence, "Tennant is Ten!". For the soundtrack of "The Christmas Invasion", a specially commissioned piece played during the sequence in which the Doctor chooses his new outfit was titled "Song for Ten". The BBC's official website refers to Tennant's Doctor as the "Tenth Doctor", as do all promotional materials for the show, such as trading cards and action figures.

[edit] Biography
The Ninth Doctor regenerates into the Tenth Doctor due to cellular damage caused by absorbing the energies of the time vortex at the climax of "The Parting of the Ways". In the Children in Need mini-episode, the Doctor initially exhibits stable behaviour as he introduces his new form to Rose Tyler, showing particular interest in his appearance, but soon begins acting erratically and says that his regeneration has "gone wrong". He remains in a delirious or comatose state through most of the events of "The Christmas Invasion" until his regeneration is settled through absorbing the free radicals and tannin from some hot tea that had dripped onto a power source inside the TARDIS. He then saves the Earth from invasion by defeating the leader of the alien Sycorax using a satsuma. The Doctor's right hand is severed in the fight, although he regenerates a new one since his regeneration cycle was not fully completed.

The Tenth Doctor and Rose go on to rescue Queen Victoria from a werewolf. The Doctor is knighted as "Sir Doctor of TARDIS" as a reward—a title he later uses during his first journey with Martha Jones—although Victoria banishes them from the British Empire and sets up the Torchwood Institute to defend Britain from paranormal threats and wait for the Doctor's return. He finally encounters the Institute in "Army of Ghosts".

In "The Girl in the Fireplace", he develops romantic feelings for Madame de Pompadour while attempting to discover why clockwork androids on a 51st Century spaceship are stalking her throughout her life. Ultimately, he is unable to take her with him as the last, asynchronous time window returns him to her after her death.

In "The Doctor's Daughter", the TARDIS takes the Doctor, Martha, and Donna Noble to the planet Messaline in an unspecified time period. Armed human colonists forcefully extrapolate the Doctor's DNA and create a young female soldier for their army. She later chooses the name "Jenny", as suggested by Donna, alluding to her status as a "generated anomaly". Despite being reminded of the loss of his family and his former status as a parent, the Doctor eventually accepts her as his 'daughter', only to be separated from her by the end of the episode after he believes her to have died, not knowing that she later returned to life.

The Tenth Doctor has used his psychic abilities more often on screen than his previous incarnations. He continues to use the Ninth Doctor's psychic paper, but has also been seen using telepathic techniques several times (for instance, in "The Girl in the Fireplace" and "The Shakespeare Code"). In "Last of the Time Lords", he uses his telepathic skills over a year to tap into the Archangel satellite network to rejuvenate himself with humanity's belief in him. He is then able to manipulate the combined energy apparently created by that belief, using it alternately as a shield and as a weapon, in the form of telekinesis.

In "The Stolen Earth" the Tenth Doctor is shot by a Dalek while running toward Rose. Captain Jack and Rose bring the Doctor into the TARDIS where he begins the regeneration process. During the process, he directs the regeneration energy towards his previously severed hand that is connected to the TARDIS, keeping the Doctor in the same form. Later Donna Noble inadvertently causes a "human biological metacrisis" by touching the severed hand, which causes a part human, part Time Lord version of the Doctor to be created. Whether he has used up one of his regenerations is not explored; in Doctor Who Confidential for this episode, Tennant says he thinks this is up to future writers. At the end of the series' events he is alone in the TARDIS; in the following special episode, "Music of the Spheres", his musical talent is revealed, when he has taken his mind off his loneliness by composing an "Ode to the Universe".

[edit] Companions

The companions of the Tenth Doctor. Top: Rose Tyler, Martha Jones, Donna Noble, Captain Jack Harkness and Rosita. Bottom: Sarah Jane Smith, Mickey Smith, Astrid Peth, Lady Christina de Souza and Jackson Lake.The Tenth Doctor gained Rose Tyler (played by Billie Piper) as his companion, who left in "Doomsday", the final episode of the 2006 series, seemingly stranded forever on a parallel world. At the end of the same episode, a bride named Donna Noble, played by Catherine Tate, appeared in the TARDIS as a result of her Huon particle intake, and appeared in the 2006 Christmas special, "The Runaway Bride". In the episode's dénouement, she refused his offer of full-time companionship, instead suggesting he find someone else. She did, however, return as the full time companion for Series 4.[10] Rose also returns for the three final episodes in Series 4, after making three foreshadowing appearances throughout the series, none of which were witnessed by the Doctor.[11] After a hectic reunion in the series finale "Journey's End", Rose's story appears to end when she is left to live on her parallel world with a partially-human tenth Doctor, a man with all his memories and his personality who will age and live and die as a normal human unable to regenerate. Donna's time with the Doctor also ends in this episode because, as a Human-Time Lord hybrid she is imbued with Time Lord knowledge, her brain cannot cope with. To save her, the Doctor wipes all memories of their adventures together from her mind and returns her to her mother and grandfather.

Rose's boyfriend, Mickey Smith (Noel Clarke), a recurring character from the previous season, joined the TARDIS as a regular companion in "School Reunion". Mickey departed the TARDIS in "The Age of Steel", replacing his deceased counterpart Ricky on a parallel Earth. He returned and departed for good in the 2006 two-part series finale, "Army of Ghosts" and "Doomsday", and again for the 2008 finale "Journey's End", where having broken up with Rose and seen his parallel grandmother die on a parallel Earth, is content to return to his homeworld and parts ways with the Doctor, this time alongside Martha and Jack.

Rose's mother, Jackie Tyler (Camille Coduri), was also a recurring character in the first two series, and played a major role in several episodes, notably "The Parting of the Ways", "The Christmas Invasion" and "Love & Monsters", finally travelling in the TARDIS by accident in "Army of Ghosts". Though she travelled in the TARDIS with the Doctor she is not necessarily considered a companion. She does however appear alongside Mickey in "Journey's End", and is brought before Davros as one of the Doctor's "children of time", although is not treated as a companion by the Doctor in the episode. She returns to the parallel world with Rose and the Doctor clone in the dénouement.

In series three the Doctor was joined by a new companion called Martha Jones, played by Freema Agyeman.[12] Agyeman previously played Adeola in "Army of Ghosts", a character who died during the course of the episode, later revealed to be Martha's cousin.[13] Martha joins the Doctor after they save each other's lives during a Plasmavore attack, and the Doctor offers her a single trip in the TARDIS by way of thanks. She continues as his companion following a trip to the Globe Theatre, and was made an "official" companion—by receiving a key to the TARDIS—in "42". Martha returns to Earth to finish her medical training in "Last of the Time Lords", but leaves her superphone with the Doctor so she can call him if she wants to come back, which she did in two episodes of the fourth series; requiring the Doctor's help on Earth. Martha, The Doctor and Donna proceeded to battle classic series monsters, the Sontarans. She was accidentally brought to Messaline along with the Doctor and Donna in the episode, "The Doctor's Daughter", when the TARDIS piloted itself. Martha returned for the two-part series finale ("The Stolen Earth" and "Journey's End"), where, after the story's events, she stayed on Earth with Jack and Mickey Smith. An "in-between" guest stint in the Doctor Who spin-off series Torchwood revealed that Martha had qualified as a doctor and now works for the Doctor's former employers, UNIT.

Previous companion "Captain" Jack Harkness was originally to have rejoined the TARDIS crew in the 2006 series. However, this plan was abandoned, in part because of Harkness' role in Torchwood. It was initially announced that there would be no crossovers between the two series,[14] but Harkness returned to Doctor Who in "Utopia" for the final three episodes of the 2007 series. In "Last of the Time Lords", the Doctor re-offers Jack full-time companionship but the events of the episode cause Jack to realise that his friends in Cardiff need him, declining the offer he had pined for.

The Doctor was also reunited with previous companions Sarah Jane Smith and K-9 (Mark III) in "School Reunion", with Sarah Jane returning with full companion status in the final two episodes of series four.[15] The K-9 model given to Sarah Jane at the conclusion of "School Reunion" becomes a close ally of Sarah Jane's, and assists her and the Doctor in "Journey's End" from a distance.

Although she is not considered an official companion, the character of Sally Sparrow in the 2007 episode "Blink" fulfils many of the functions of a companion in this episode, in which she is "recruited" by the Doctor to rescue him from 1969; the episode focuses on her as she follows clues left for her by the Doctor and several allies throughout time, before she actually meets the Doctor at the story's conclusion. The episode "The Girl in the Fireplace" has the Doctor offering Madame de Pompadour the chance to become a companion (if briefly), but circumstances render this impossible and she dies before being able to take him up on the offer. After Martha's departure, pop star Kylie Minogue appeared in the 2007 Christmas special, "Voyage of the Damned", playing a character named Astrid Peth, a "one-off companion" for the episode.[16] Both she, and later, Jenny, the Doctor's "daughter" by cloning, accept offers of companionship from him only for circumstances to prevent them from doing so.

In the 2008 series episodes "Silence in the Library" and "Forest of the Dead", the Doctor encounters Professor River Song, a 51st-century archaeologist he will apparently meet in the future and become dear to him. It is never explicitly stated that she was a companion, but she states that they travelled together often and she gained his complete trust, to the point that she would eventually know the Doctor's true name.

The Tenth Doctor is the first since the Second Doctor to actually say "goodbye" to a companion (specifically, Sarah Jane) rather than simply leaving, or giving some platitude when a companion leaves of their own accord. He has made many mentions of Rose Tyler since her departure to Martha Jones and Donna Noble (and has had references of her made to him), although in past incarnations, he has also made the occasional repeated reference to the likes of his granddaughter Susan and Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart. At one point, he used "Doctor James McCrimmon" as an alias, another reference to a previous companion. The finale episode "Journey's End" sees the Doctor bidding farewell to all six companions who assisted him in that episode—Jack, Martha, Mickey, Sarah Jane, Rose and Donna, as well as Jackie and his part-human clone.

[edit] Personality
The Tenth Doctor generally displays a light-hearted, talkative, easy-going, witty and cheeky manner, but combines this with a somewhat egocentric sense of unstoppability when facing his enemies. He is perhaps as ruthless and dangerous as his seventh incarnation ever was, although much less inclined to complex schemes and set goals. This emerged early on when he sent the Sycorax leader (who was attacking him from behind) falling to his death while commenting that, with him, there were "no second chances."[17] In "School Reunion", he acknowledges that he is less merciful than he used to be and has stuck to his "one warning" code, punishing his enemies if they persist in their hostilities. This was most explicitly demonstrated in "The Runaway Bride" when he drowned the Empress of Racnoss' children, and in "The Family of Blood" where he gave each Family member an individual and eternal punishment. In "Forest of the Dead", the Doctor supports his immense self-belief in his abilities and authority in a different way by causing the Vashta Nerada to acquiesce to his ultimatum simply by stating they were in the universe's biggest library and should "Look him up". However, in "Partners in Crime", after giving his adversary, Miss Foster, an explicit warning, he tried to save her life at the end of the episode and did not punish her Adipose foster children "because they're children". Donna notes that Martha had been a positive influence on him, citing his infanticide of the Racnoss in their previous encounter. Like his past selves, he is critical of weapons, going as far as to describe people with guns as "the enemy" in "The Sontaran Stratagem". His strong personal sense of justice makes him quick to anger when he feels it is violated, as in "New Earth" when he learned of the plague farm run by the Sisters of Plenitude, and after Prime Minister Harriet Jones had given the order to destroy the retreating Sycorax ship, the Doctor warned her that he could "bring down" her government with six words ("Don't you think she looks tired?", whispered to Jones' aide, Alex, which resulted in rumors that led to scandals and investigations, resulting in the end of Harriet Jones' political career).

Like the Seventh and Ninth Doctor, the Tenth sometimes uses a cheerful, energetic façade to mask inner emotions. He has a tendency to babble, mixing apparent nonsense with vital information, sometimes acting erratically to put his enemies off guard like some of his earlier incarnations. He can also be rude on occasion, and is not always aware of it, being prone to making comments that to outsiders seem obtuse or rude, sometimes to his own embarrassment. In "The Christmas Invasion" and "Tooth and Claw", he is surprised at his own unintentional rudeness when making disparaging remarks, and Jack Harkness, after reuniting with the Doctor, notes that his "new regeneration (is) kinda cheeky."[18] He has a tendency to use technobabble to describe scientific concepts before substituting it with a simpler, analogous explanation. Further to this, he tends to infantilise names and concepts — his description of non-linear temporal physics as "a big ball of wibbly wobbly, timey wimey stuff" is perhaps the most well known example.[19] He is also able to rapidly switch between moods, from mania to anger to nonchalance and uses this as a form of reverse psychology on several occasions ("Fear Her", "Love & Monsters" and "Army of Ghosts"). In the latter, by switching gears suddenly after failing to dissuade Yvonne Hartman from her current activities, he is able to make her uncertain enough to get his way. Unlike the Ninth Doctor, who showed off his vengeful, rage-filled dark side when up against the Daleks, the Tenth Doctor displayed a more confident, self-assured side when around them, but did not hesitate to taunt them.

It has been made clear that the Doctor is, despite constant interaction with others, a lonely person deep down. In "School Reunion", he describes the ability of Time Lords to live so long as a curse, because while his human companions all someday leave him and eventually die, he continues to live. Other characters have also commented on the Tenth Doctor's loneliness. During a conversation with his nemesis, the Master, he admits that since the end of the Time War and the loss of the other Time Lords, he has been "alone ever since", viewing the Master's return as the end of this loneliness. Indeed, when the Master subsequently dies, the Doctor openly weeps over his body. While the Ninth Doctor was somewhat standoffish in certain situations, particularly "domestics", the Tenth is more extroverted and gregarious, having quickly established a firmer rapport with Rose Tyler's friends and family than he ever did in his previous incarnation, though his talkativeness sometimes irritates others not used to him. The Tenth Doctor is openly fond of mankind and is apparently in awe of their tenacity and curiosity, a trait previously exhibited by his fourth incarnation. In "The Impossible Planet", he hugs the leader of an Earth expedition for daring to explore a planet orbiting a black hole "because it's there". In "The Age of Steel", he describes human beings as both brilliant and stupid in the same sentence while arguing the necessity of emotions with the Cyber-Controller. The Doctor even goes so far as to exclaim he's willing to battle the Master across the cosmos as long as he leaves Earth alone in "The Sound of Drums". However, he is also quick to criticise mankind when he feels it is necessary.[20] Indeed, his confidence in the human race becomes far less pronounced in later series, and at the end of "Midnight" he is left speechless after witnessing the steps humans can become willing to take when placed in a threatening situation; almost being killed by a panicky group of people who turn on him.

The Doctor also feels regret of the deaths of both his friends and enemies. In "Journey's End", he has a flashback of those who have died instead of/for him, including Astrid Peth, Jenny, Luke Rattigan, Lynda Moss, and the air stewardess from Midnight. He also offers Davros the chance to escape the destruction of the Dalek mothership, but Davros spits the chance back at him, calling him the Destroyer of Worlds in his seemingly final moments.

The Tenth Doctor and Rose often faced their adventures with a cheerful, almost blasé attitude, even when terror and death happened around them, contrasting his previous selves, who displayed more serious attitudes when in trouble. Queen Victoria commented on this in "Tooth and Claw" when she banished them (as did Agatha Christie to the Doctor alone in "The Unicorn and the Wasp"), and producer Russell T Davies hinted that there would be consequences to this carefree attitude later in the 2006 series. In "Doomsday", the two were separated seemingly forever when Rose was left in a parallel universe as a consequence of foiling a Dalek and Cyberman invasion of Earth.

The 2006 series continued the exploration of the Doctor's romantic aspects, with the Tenth Doctor sharing kisses with Rose (albeit while she was possessed by Lady Cassandra) and Madame de Pompadour. In "School Reunion", Sarah Jane Smith all but confesses that she had been in love with him. In "Doomsday", during their farewell, Rose tells the Doctor she loves him; he begins to reply but only manages to say her name before the transmission is cut off, leaving him alone in the TARDIS with tears on his cheeks. After this, whenever he is reminded of Rose he sometimes becomes depressed or pensive. In the audio commentary for "Doomsday" the executive producer Julie Gardner claimed that she will confirm to the nation the Doctor was going to "say it back." In 2007 episodes, the Doctor gradually learnt that Martha harboured feelings for him before she left his company — which he inadvertently inspired by kissing her as a distraction[21] — and also exchanged kisses with Astrid in honour of "an old tradition" from her home planet. Following the complications with Martha (for which he blames himself), the Doctor seems reluctant to embark on any other potentially romantic companionship, and makes sure that before allowing her to join him, Donna understands that all he wants is a friend. In keeping with this, when he is poisoned in "The Unicorn and the Wasp" and asks Donna to give him a shock of some kind, kissing him proves to be so out of character for her that it is sufficient to trigger the detox process.

The Tenth Doctor sometimes dons a pair of spectacles, like the Fifth Doctor, whose youthful appearance he shares. In the 2007 Children In Need special, "Time Crash", the Tenth Doctor notes other inherited/inspired tendencies when meeting the Fifth Doctor aside from "the brainy specs" (which he observes were worn by the Fifth simply to look clever rather than out of necessity, therefore implying that his are used for the same reason) such as wearing plimsolls/trainers and both of their voices becoming high-pitched when shouting. He also exhibits a remarkable sense of taste, again similar to the Fifth Doctor, (Planet of Fire), able to identify the blood type of a blood sample ("The Christmas Invasion") or the presence of mistletoe oil ("Tooth and Claw") just by licking. He also shares the Fifth Doctor's skill with a cricket ball, as demonstrated in "Human Nature". The Tenth also admitted to the Fifth that he was his favourite past incarnation.

The Tenth Doctor speaks with an Estuary English accent, rather than the Salford, Greater Manchester (Christopher Eccleston's own accent) that the Ninth Doctor used, the Received Pronunciation of most earlier Doctors, or Tennant's natural Scottish English. David Tennant told SFX magazine in 2006 that Russell Davies had asked him to drop his natural Scottish accent, because he felt "we'd like to not go for another obvious regional accent, because I suppose they'd done that".[22] In a December 23 interview on BBC Radio 1, Tennant explained that a line had been scripted for the Christmas special explaining that the newly regenerated Doctor had imprinted on Rose Tyler's accent, "like a chick hatching from an egg," but the line was cut from the final programme. The Tenth Doctor also briefly affected a generic American Appalachian accent in "The Christmas Invasion", and a Scottish accent (David Tennant's own) in "Tooth and Claw".

[edit] Appearance
The Doctor seemed disappointed that his tenth incarnation was not "ginger", but has worn his own dark brown hair in various ways throughout the series: unstyled in "The Christmas Invasion", a fifties-style quiff in "The Idiot's Lantern", and flattened forwards in "The Runaway Bride". He is also perceived by most, including companions and other characters as "just a little bit foxy".[23]

He wears a dark brown (with blue pinstripes) or a blue (with brown pinstripes) suit, a shirt and a tie (otherwise, open-shirted with a light grey t-shirt/vest ("Tooth and Claw", "Planet of the Ood"), a red-hued t-shirt ("42") or a black t-shirt ("Midnight"), a light brown overcoat (which he claims was given to him by Janis Joplin), and a pair of trainers, in colours ranging from white (brown suit), black (dinner jacket) or burgundy (blue suit), a costume which Tennant described as "geek chic".[24] The blue suit debuted in Series 3 episode 1, "Smith and Jones", and both suits were worn from his adventures with Martha Jones onwards, until the fourth series finale "Journey's End" in which an identical Doctor donned the blue suit and was left in a parallel universe with Rose Tyler. According to an interview on Parkinson, David Tennant and Russell T Davies got the idea for the Tenth Doctor's costume from an outfit Jamie Oliver had worn on Parkinson just after David had taken the role. Another part of the Doctor's costume is a pair of dark tortoise-shell rectangular frame glasses; since The Christmas Invasion he has worn them in numerous episodes. As noted above, the Tenth Doctor credited the Fifth Doctor with inspiring his footwear and glasses.

[edit] Knowledge of popular culture
Like his predecessor, the Tenth Doctor shows a fondness for human popular culture—a characteristic not all of his previous incarnations seemed to share—but even more so, to the point where he finds himself unknowingly quoting the song "Circle of Life" from Disney's The Lion King during a confrontation with the Sycorax leader. In "School Reunion" he responded to a student with 'correctamundo', an exclamation often made by The Fonz on the TV show Happy Days, though he vowed that it would be the only time he uttered the word. In "The Girl in the Fireplace", he sings "I Could Have Danced All Night" from the musical My Fair Lady. He also appears to be a fan of pop music, quoting Kylie Minogue (in "The Idiot's Lantern") and Status Quo, and has made quips about Balamory (in "Tooth and Claw"), EastEnders (in "The Impossible Planet"), and Ghostbusters (in "Army of Ghosts"). He also has a fondness for pop/rock music, attempting to take Rose to an Ian Dury and the Blockheads concert in 1979, and Elvis Presley's appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show in NYC in the 1950s (he fails to reach his destination both times). Also, in "42" he refers to the Beatles song "Here Comes the Sun". In "The Shakespeare Code", he mentions having read the seventh Harry Potter novel (which made him cry), and, at Martha's suggestion, shouts out "Expelliarmus" as a magic word for Shakespeare to use, as well as referencing Back to the Future when explaining the mechanics of "the infinite temporal flux" to Martha. In "The Christmas Invasion" he compares himself to Arthur Dent, a character from Douglas Adams's The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, referring to Dent as a "nice man". Whether the Doctor actually met Dent or if he was just teasing Rose is unclear, given that the Fourth Doctor was shown reading and discussing a book written by a character from the Hitchhiker's series in Destiny of the Daleks (a reference inserted by Adams himself, at the time a script editor and writer for the show), while the Seventh Doctor once referred to one of Adams's lines in Ghost Light. In "The Fires of Pompeii", the Doctor excuses Donna Noble's behaviour by claiming "she's from...Barcelona", a statement that was used often in comedy series Fawlty Towers by Basil Fawlty to apologise for the mistakes of Spanish waiter Manuel; in the same episode, both Donna and the Doctor state "I'm Spartacus!" in reference to the film Spartacus. In "Planet of the Ood", the Doctor references The Beatles again, specifically their Magical Mystery Tour (though he only uses the last two words).

His knowledge of contemporary pop culture is not comprehensive however. In "The Lazarus Experiment" he fails to recognise the term "science geek" when Tish Jones applies the label to him. Once he is provided with a definition he does choose to take it as a compliment, though.

His references are not all restricted to modern pop-culture. In "Tooth and Claw", his description of Rose as a "tim'rous beastie" is an allusion to the poem "To a Mouse" by Robert Burns, an 18th century Scottish poet. In "The Shakespeare Code" he quotes from the poem "Do not go gentle into that good night" by Dylan Thomas and displays an expansive knowledge of the works of William Shakespeare, both directly and indirectly suggesting famous lines to the man himself, unsurprising considering the Fourth Doctor claimed he transcribed the first folio of Hamlet on (an older) Shakespeare's behalf.[25] Shakespeare himself seems to recognise the Doctor as having knowledge of his work both past and future, asking for permission before borrowing things the Doctor has said, and unquestioningly accepting it when told he can't use one line because the doctor says its "Someone else's". He has also quoted from the T. S. Eliot poem "The Hollow Men", referencing both the "Falls the Shadow" and "This is the way the world ends" passages.

[edit] Personality quirks
A scene filmed for the episode "Human Nature" but cut from the final broadcast (and included in the Deleted Scenes feature in the Season 3 DVD set) reveals that the Tenth Doctor has a strong dislike for pears, to the point of ordering Martha to prevent the Doctor, during his period disguised as John Smith, from eating any. The scene was adapted from the original "Human Nature" novel by the same writer, Paul Cornell, where the Seventh Doctor orders Bernice Summerfield to do the same for him when he becomes John Smith. The canonicity of the scene, as it was cut from the final broadcast and originated in spin-off fiction, is unclear. The deleted scene, along with a scene in "Voyage of the Damned", also illustrates that the Doctor sometimes has trouble with ordinal lists, starting with one numbering system (1, 2, 3, etc.) and unintentionally switching to a different one (a, b, c, etc.) and back again. He corrects himself when he notices that he has done this, but also appears quite annoyed at himself for doing it in the first place.

This Doctor, more than any other it seems, can be incredibly absent minded at times, having forgotten to tell Mickey to cease calibrating the TARDIS in "Rise of the Cybermen", leading to the group's unceremonious arrival on an alternate Earth. This absentmindedness is also witnessed in "The Idiot's Lantern" and "Tooth and Claw", in which the Doctor easily confuses years and locations (i.e. 1879 for 1979, London for New York). In the mini-episode "Time Crash", while making repairs to the TARDIS, the Tenth Doctor forgets to put the shields back up, resulting in the TARDIS colliding and merging with the Fifth Doctor's TARDIS. He then forgets to raise the shields a second time, causing the TARDIS to crash into the Starship Titanic in the episode "Voyage of the Damned". In "The Sound of Drums", he forgets to mention to Martha and Captain Jack Harkness that he has a plan to stop The Master.

Like the Ninth Doctor, the Tenth Doctor used his sonic screwdriver quite often. This Doctor relied heavily on the device, and chided his fifth incarnation for going "hands free" in "Time Crash", a reference to the Fifth Doctor's loss of the device in "The Visitation". This reliance came to head when the screwdriver was burned out in "Smith and Jones", having been pushed past its limits in order to boost the radiation output of an x-ray machine. He obtains another screwdriver by the end of the episode.

Much as the Ninth Doctor frequently declared things "Fantastic!", this Doctor has also favoured certain phrases on various occasions such as "What!?" (when referring to something unexpected happening, an exclamation also favoured by the Fourth Doctor), "Brilliant!", "That's impossible!", "I'm sorry, I'm so sorry", "That's just cheating!", the Italian expression 'Molto Bene' ('Very good'), "They have a little shop!" (referring to gift shops), and the French expression "Allons-y" ("Let's go"). The latter was first used in "Army of Ghosts," where the Doctor stated that he should say it more often and that he would love to meet someone named Alonso so he could say "Allons-y, Alonso!", eventually achieving this aim in "Voyage of the Damned" with midshipman Alonso Frame. In the same episode he also uses the phrase "Take me to your leader" when talking to the host robots, before saying "I've always wanted to say that". In addition, he often clarifies his own mistakes by beginning with an elongated "Well...", for example when he illustrates how only one of Agatha Christie's novels managed to fool him in "The Unicorn and the Wasp". On occasions he would also use the phrase "Don't do that," after his companion has tried to imitate an accent. He also enjoys making abstruse English puns (eg. lava/"lather" in "The Fires of Pompeii" and intruder/"in tru da" in "The Sontaran Stratagem", incidentally repeating another character's "in tru da window" pun from the 2005 episode "Dalek").
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 3:57 pm

The Eleventh Doctor is the announced eleventh incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor, who will appear on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who beginning in 2010. Matt Smith was cast to replace David Tennant, who will depart from Doctor Who.[4]

Within the series' narrative, the Doctor is a centuries-old alien, a Time Lord from the planet Gallifrey, who travels in time and space in his TARDIS, frequently with companions. When the Doctor is critically injured, he can regenerate his body but in doing so gains a new physical appearance and with it, a distinct new personality. Smith will portray the eleventh such incarnation.


Appearances
[edit] Television
The Eleventh Doctor first appears in the final minutes of The End of Time (2010) when his previous incarnation violently regenerates, causing serious damage to the TARDIS and sending it crashing down to Earth. He debuts fully in "The Eleventh Hour", where he meets Amy Pond (Karen Gillan) after investigating the mysterious crack in her wall as child. Amy agrees to join the Doctor as his travelling companion on the eve of her marriage to Rory Williams (Arthur Darvill). In "Victory of the Daleks", he is tricked into spawning a new generation of Daleks, and re-encounters future companion River Song (Alex Kingston) and powerful enemies the Weeping Angels in two-parter "The Time of Angels"/"Flesh and Stone", where they uncover that cracks like the one in Amy's wall are erasing individuals wholecloth from time and space. Following Amy's attempted seduction of the Doctor, Rory becomes the Doctor's second assistant from "The Vampires of Venice" up until "Cold Blood", where he is killed by a Silurian and absorbed by a crack. The Doctor confronts his dark side and self-hatred in "Amy's Choice", where he is put through trials by the Dream Lord (Toby Jones), a manifestation of the Doctor's self-loathing for his arrogance, selfishness and lust. In finale episodes "The Pandorica Opens" and "The Big Bang", friends of the Doctor from the 2010 series communicate a message to him. Vincent van Gogh (Tony Curran) paints a psychic message of the TARDIS exploding, which passes from Winston Churchill (Ian McNeice) to Queen Elizabeth X (Sophie Okonedo), before reaching the Doctor via River Song. An alliance of the Doctor's greatest enemies seal him in the 'Pandorica', an inescapable prison. When the TARDIS explodes, a new timeline is created where the Earth is the only planet in a universe without stars. The Doctor is freed by a plastic replicant of Rory, and travels using River's vortex manipulator to 1996 where he uses the Pandorica to resurrect the universe, seal the cracks, and undo their effects. Although the Doctor is himself wiped from time and space, he returns when Amy is able to remember him, appearing at her wedding to Rory, who is alive in the new timeline. The three take off together for new adventures. The Eleventh Doctor is set to appear later in 2010 in Death of the Doctor, a two-part story of spin-off series The Sarah Jane Adventures, alongside former companions Sarah Jane Smith (Elisabeth Sladen) and Jo Grant (Katy Manning).[21]

[edit] Literature
Like the Tenth Doctor, the Eleventh appears in New Series Adventures novels in 2010 alongside Amy. The first of these is Apollo 23 by Justin Richards, as well as the Decide Your Destiny series of interactive novels. The character also appears in comic books published in Doctor Who Magazine, Doctor Who Adventures, and he is set to take over from the Tenth Doctor in IDW Publishing's ongoing Doctor Who series.

[edit] Audio drama
The Eleventh Doctor also appears in a series of audio books. The first of these is The Hounds of Artemis by James Goss.

[edit] Video games
The Eleventh Doctor is the first of the Doctors to appear in full-on action adventure games. Doctor Who: The Adventure Games is composed of four stories ("episodes"), produced alongside the 2010 series. Smith and Gillan lend their voice and likeness. The first, "City of the Daleks", carries on from TV episode "Victory of the Daleks" and is a stealth and puzzle game set in 1960s Earth and the Dalek planet of Skaro. The second, "Blood of the Cybermen", is Eleven and Amy's first Cyberman story; these Cybermen, ones frozen in the Artic tundra, are the first reappearance of Cybermen of the originals series from the planet Mondas.


The Eleventh Doctor spends most of his first full episode, "The Eleventh Hour" in the tattered remains of the Tenth Doctor's costume. As a result of his time traveling during the episode, for twelve years, young Amelia Pond remembers, draws, and plays make-believe games about "The Raggedy Doctor", whom she met as a child.

Near the end of "The Eleventh Hour" the Doctor acquires his clothes from the hospital's changing-room, raiding the lockers for a new outfit before his final confrontation with the episode's antagonists, defending the 'theft' on the grounds that he just saved Earth for "the millionth time". His third incarnation similarly stole his new costume from a hospital locker room in Spearhead from Space, as did the Eighth Doctor in Doctor Who.

The Doctor's outfit is a brown tweed jacket with elbow patches, bow tie, braces, rolled up trousers and black boots. He frequently refers to his affection for bow ties, often proclaiming "Bow ties are cool." [22] The Doctor habitually varies the details of the outfit, switching from a shirt, braces and bow tie combination in shades of red to the same in shades of blue.

In The Big Bang, the Doctor briefly dons a fez, stating, "Fezzes are cool", however the fez is destroyed before the end of the episode. At the episode's conclusion, he attends Amy and Rory's wedding, dressed for the occasion in a white tie ensemble, complete with a top hat and silk evening scarf.

In an interview with Doctor Who Magazine, Steven Moffat revealed that the Eleventh Doctor had an entirely different costume until close to the start of filming. The original look had a swashbuckling feel which Benjamin Cook described as "a little like something Captain Jack Sparrow wears in the Pirates of the Caribbean movies". However, Matt Smith was unhappy with the costume as he felt it reflected how someone else would dress the Doctor, rather than how the Doctor would dress himself. The eventual costume, in particular the bow-tie, was influenced by Patrick Troughton's Second Doctor, after Matt Smith fell in love with the Troughton story The Tomb of the Cybermen.


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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 4:01 pm

Companions aka friends the doctors conpaions are The First Doctor's companions
Companion Actor Seasons First appearance Last appearance Appearances with the First Doctor
Susan Foreman Carole Ann Ford 1–2 An Unearthly Child,[nb 1] The Dalek Invasion of Earth[7] 10
Barbara Wright Jacqueline Hill 1–2 An Unearthly Child[8][nb 2] The Chase[9] 16
Ian Chesterton William Russell 1–2 An Unearthly Child[8][nb 2] The Chase[9] 16
Vicki Maureen O'Brien 2–3 The Rescue[10][nb 3] The Myth Makers[11] 9
Steven Taylor Peter Purves 2–3 The Chase[9][nb 4] The Savages[12][nb 5] 10
Katarina Adrienne Hill 3 The Myth Makers[11] The Daleks' Master Plan[13] 2
Sara Kingdom[14] Jean Marsh 3 The Daleks' Master Plan[13] The Daleks' Master Plan[13] 1[nb 6]
Dodo Chaplet Jackie Lane 3 The Massacre of St Bartholomew's Eve[15] The War Machines[16] 6
Polly Anneke Wills 3–4 The War Machines The Tenth Planet 3
Ben Jackson Michael Craze 3–4 The War Machines The Tenth Planet 3

^ Susan travelled with the Doctor prior to the events of "An Unearthly Child".
^ a b The Doctor takes Barbara and Ian from their time against their will in "An Unearthly Child".
^ Vicki joins the TARDIS crew at the end of her first story, The Rescue.
^ Unbeknown to the Doctor and Vicki, Steven took refuge in the TARDIS during the events of "The Planet of Decision" and is not discovered by them until "The Watcher".
^ Steven left the Doctor in "Bell of Doom", episode four of The Massacre of St Bartholomew's Eve, but returned to him shortly afterwards in the same episode.
^ Sara Kingdom is not included in all lists of companions - the BBC's list of companions at http://www.bbc.co.uk/doctorwho/classic/episodeguide/companions/ excludes her.
[edit] The Second Doctor's companions
Companion Actor Seasons First serial Last serial Appearances with the Second Doctor
Polly Anneke Wills 4 The Power of the Daleks The Faceless Ones[17] 6
Ben Jackson Michael Craze 4 The Power of the Daleks The Faceless Ones[17] 6
Jamie McCrimmon Frazer Hines
Hamish Wilson[nb 1] 4–6 The Highlanders[18] The War Games[19][nb 2] 20
Victoria Waterfield Deborah Watling 4–5 The Evil of the Daleks Fury from the Deep 7
Zoe Heriot Wendy Padbury 5–6 The Wheel in Space The War Games[19] 8

^ Jamie was played by Hamish Wilson in The Mind Robber episodes 2 and 3.
^ Jamie later appears in the Sixth Doctor-era story The Two Doctors, once more alongside the Second Doctor.
[edit] The Third Doctor's companions
Companion Actor Seasons First serial Last serial Number of appearances with the Third Doctor
Liz Shaw Caroline John 7 Spearhead from Space Inferno 4
Jo Grant Katy Manning 8–10 Terror of the Autons The Green Death 15
Sarah Jane Smith Elisabeth Sladen 11 The Time Warrior Planet of the Spiders 5[nb 1]

^ Sarah Jane Smith has had two subsequent appearances with the Tenth Doctor, most recently in "Journey's End", as well as her own spin-off series The Sarah Jane Adventures.
[edit] The Fourth Doctor's companions
Companion Actor Seasons First serial Last serial Number of appearances with the Fourth Doctor
Sarah Jane Smith Elisabeth Sladen 12–14 Robot The Hand of Fear 13
Harry Sullivan Ian Marter 12–13 Robot Terror of the Zygons[nb 1] 7 (6 as companion)
Leela Louise Jameson 14–15 The Face of Evil The Invasion of Time 9
K-9 voice of
John Leeson 15 The Invisible Enemy The Invasion of Time 5
K-9 Mark II voice of John Leeson
voice of David Brierly[nb 2] 15–18 The Ribos Operation Warriors' Gate 17 [nb 3]
Romana Mary Tamm 16 The Ribos Operation The Armageddon Factor 6
Romana II Lalla Ward 17–18 Destiny of the Daleks Warriors' Gate 11
Adric Matthew Waterhouse 18 Full Circle Logopolis 5
Nyssa Sarah Sutton 18 The Keeper of Traken [20] Logopolis 2
Tegan Jovanka Janet Fielding 18 Logopolis Logopolis 1

^ Harry also appears in The Android Invasion.
^ K-9 was voiced by Brierly in season 17, explained away as laryngitis within the programme.
^ Subsequent models of K-9 have made appearances with Sarah Jane Smith in various episodes, due to the Doctor's giving Sarah Jane a version of K-9 in the aborted spin-off K-9 and Company. He has also appeared in The Sarah Jane Adventures. K-9 is due to be the subject of his own spin-off, produced separate from the BBC, entitled simply K-9.
[edit] The Fifth Doctor's companions
Companion Actor Seasons First serial Last serial Number of appearances with the Fifth Doctor
Adric Matthew Waterhouse 19 Castrovalva Earthshock[nb 1][nb 2] 8 (6 as companion)
Nyssa Sarah Sutton 19–20 Castrovalva Terminus[nb 2] 12 (11 as companion)
Tegan Jovanka Janet Fielding 19–21 Castrovalva Resurrection of the Daleks[nb 2] 19 (18 as companion)
Vislor Turlough Mark Strickson 20–21 Mawdryn Undead Planet of Fire[nb 2] 11 (10 as companion)
Kamelion voice of Gerald Flood 20–21 The King's Demons Planet of Fire[nb 2] 3 (2 as companion)[nb 3]
Peri Brown Nicola Bryant 21 Planet of Fire The Caves of Androzani 2

^ also appears in Time-Flight
^ a b c d e also appears inThe Caves of Androzani
^ Without explanation in the stories, Kamelion is not featured in the five serials between his first and last stories (although he does appear in deleted scenes from The Awakening).
[edit] The Sixth Doctor's companions
Companion Actor Seasons First serial Last serial Number of appearances with the Sixth Doctor
Peri Brown Nicola Bryant 21–23 The Twin Dilemma The Trial of a Time Lord: Mindwarp 9
Melanie "Mel" Bush Bonnie Langford 23 The Trial of a Time Lord: Terror of the Vervoids[nb 1] The Trial of a Timelord: The Ultimate Foe 2

^ The series never establishes how the Doctor first meets Mel; she just appears mid-way through The Trial of a Time Lord. The Doctor's first meeting with Mel is recounted in the Past Doctor Adventures novel Business Unusual.
[edit] The Seventh Doctor's companions
Companion Actor Seasons First serial Last serial Number of appearances with the Seventh Doctor
Melanie "Mel" Bush Bonnie Langford 24 Time and the Rani Dragonfire 4
Ace Sophie Aldred 24–26 Dragonfire Survival 9[nb 1]

^ Ace's fate is unknown past Survival and her appearance in Dimensions in Time, as she does not appear in the following story, the 1996 film.
[edit] The Eighth Doctor's companion
Companion Actor Production Year Story
Dr. Grace Holloway Daphne Ashbrook Television movie 1996 Doctor Who

[edit] The Ninth Doctor's companions
Companion Actor Series First episode Last episode Number of appearances with the Ninth Doctor
Rose Tyler Billie Piper 1 "Rose" "The Parting of the Ways" 13
Adam Mitchell Bruno Langley[nb 1] 1 "Dalek" "The Long Game" 2
Captain Jack Harkness[nb 2] John Barrowman 1 "The Empty Child" "The Parting of the Ways" 5

^ Bruno Langley was not added to the opening sequence and was the first to be fired as a companion for breaking the rules.
^ Jack Harkness was the first openly LGBT (in this case pansexual) companion.
[edit] The Tenth Doctor's companions
Companion Actor Series First episode Last episode Number of appearances with the Tenth Doctor
Rose Tyler Billie Piper 2005 Specials, 2, 4 "Doctor Who: Children in Need"[nb 1] "Journey's End"[nb 2] 21[nb 3] (18 as companion)
Sarah Jane Smith Elisabeth Sladen 4 "The Stolen Earth"[nb 4] "Journey's End" 3 (2 as companion)
Mickey Smith Noel Clarke 2, 4 "School Reunion"[nb 5] "Journey's End"[nb 6] 9 (5 as companion)
Donna Noble Catherine Tate Christmas Special 2006, 4 "The Runaway Bride"[nb 7] "Journey's End" 15 (14 as companion)
Martha Jones Freema Agyeman 3, 4 "Smith and Jones" "Journey's End"[nb 8] 18
Captain Jack Harkness John Barrowman 3, 4 "Utopia" "Journey's End"[nb 9] 5
Astrid Peth[21][22] Kylie Minogue Christmas Special 2007 "Voyage of the Damned"[21] "Voyage of the Damned" 1
Jackson Lake [nb 10] David Morrissey Christmas Special 2008 "The Next Doctor" "The Next Doctor" 1
Rosita[23] Velile Tshabalala Christmas Special 2008 "The Next Doctor" "The Next Doctor" 1
Lady Christina de Souza[24] Michelle Ryan 2009 Specials "Planet of the Dead" "Planet of the Dead" 1
Adelaide[25][nb 11] Lindsay Duncan 2009 Specials "The Waters of Mars" "The Waters of Mars" 1
Wilfred Mott[26] Bernard Cribbins[26] 2009 Specials 2009 Christmas special 1[nb 12] "The End of Time" 9 (2 as companion)

[edit] The Eleventh Doctor's companion
Companion Actor Series First episode Last episode Number of appearances with the Eleventh Doctor
Amy Pond[29] Karen Gillan[30] 5 Episode 1 N/A TBC

[edit] River Song
River Song is an archaeologist who states that she has travelled with the Doctor in his relative future (her relative past).[31] Although the Doctor first meets her on the Library planet in "Silence in the Library", she states that she has met him on several occasions prior to that in her relative timeline but in a time yet to come for the Doctor.[32] It is suggested that at some point they share an intimate relationship of some sort, and River Song reveals that she knows the Doctor's real name, which she whispers in his ear, thus gaining his trust.[33] River Song appears to be familiar with the TARDIS,[34] and apparently has first-hand knowledge of The Doctor's future encounters with alien races.[35] She also possesses a sonic screwdriver, which she says a future Doctor gave her. This is cited as evidence of his trust in her, and the Doctor considers it highly surprising she should have it – claiming he'd not give anyone else his sonic screwdriver. As the episode unfolds, the Doctor may have had ulterior motives for this, in addition to trust. River Song dies while using her brain as a memory buffer for The Library's data core, thus saving the Doctor, Donna, and the 4,022 people trapped in the data core in "Forest of the Dead", although in the last minutes of the show, the Doctor searches the sonic screwdriver he left her and finds a communications device similar to the ones used in the Lux Industries' suits, and is able to store a digital impression of her personality (thus "saving" her) onto the "hard drive" in the planet's core. Alex Kingston, who plays River Song, has been seen filming an episode for series five. As of July 2009[update] the BBC have not confirmed whom she will play.[36]
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeWed Oct 07, 2009 5:44 pm

Since Paul McGann's portrayal of the Doctor was so short, many fans of the Doctor Who cannon, pretty much wrote him off. But with the ingenuity of the BBC and their audio productions the eighth Doctor was able to be fully vested in the Doctor Who lore.
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PostSubject: Re: Doctor Who?   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeThu Oct 08, 2009 4:32 am

Good morning!!!! anyone who like Dr. Who will enjoy the video clip-great addition to the web site alien alien
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PostSubject: Time and the rini ( Doctor no. 7 saga part 1)   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeSun Nov 01, 2009 7:40 am

Plot


[edit] Synopsis
The TARDIS is attacked by a powerful force whilst in flight. The entire console room is distorting and the Sixth Doctor and Melanie Bush are both knocked unconscious. The ship then materialises on the planet Lakertya as a Lakertyan, Ikona, looks on. The TARDIS' doors open and the renegade Time Lady, the Rani enters. She tells her unseen companion to "leave the girl" and that the Doctor was "the man I want." As she leaves, a lumbering, hair-covered creature, Urak, enters and turns the Doctor's prone body over. At this moment, the Doctor undergoes regeneration.

At her Lakertya base, the Seventh Doctor regains consciousness in the Rani’s laboratory, where she is supervising the incarceration of a kidnapped Albert Einstein. The Doctor's mental state is caught in his former persona, and he recalls his last conversation immediately before he was forced to regenerate. He overcomes his temporary disorientation and recognises the Rani. Examining her equipment, he sees an asteroid which he identifies as being composed of strange matter. The Rani refuses to discuss her "ethics" with him and pulls a gun on him; he tries to run, but trips. The Rani's assistant Sarn rushes to help the Doctor; when the Rani threatens to punish her she escapes, but the Doctor is stunned and captured.

Inside the TARDIS, Ikona rescues Mel, who soon regains consciousness and escapes, only to run into Sarn. In her panic, Sarn traps herself inside a transparent bubble, which explodes and kills her.

The Rani orders Urak to reset the trap while she injects the Doctor with an amnesia drug. When the Doctor comes round, the Rani pretends to be Mel, asking him to repair a faulty machine in her laboratory. Ikona recaptures Mel, believing her to be in league with the Rani. She saves him from another of the bubble traps, convincing him that she is friendly.

Puzzled and confused, the Doctor refuses to continue work. He and the Rani return to his TARDIS to fetch a radiation wave meter. There, the Doctor changes his clothes, choosing a new outfit for himself.

Mel sees Urak and stumbles into a bubble trap. Ikona rescues her and they retrieve some weapons and head for the Rani’s fortress. Ikona meets Sarn’s mother Faroon. Faroon discovers her daughter’s skeleton and goes to speak with the Rani's other assistant, Beyus.

The Rani is captured by Urak who mistakes her for Mel. Mel meanwhile makes her way into the Rani’s control room where the Doctor believes her to be the Rani. The two travellers eventually identify one another by feeling each other’s pulses. Beyus tells the Doctor the combination to unlock the control room door – it is 953, the Rani's age (also the Doctor's).

Outside the control room, Mel finds the cabinets containing Einstein and other kidnapped geniuses and sees that a space is reserved for the Doctor. The Rani returns; the Doctor hides in a dark Tetrap eyrie. The Rani locks the gate behind him and he finds himself surrounded by awaking Tetraps.

Beyus rescues the Doctor and tells him to go to the Lakertyan’s Centre of Leisure, where the reason for Beyus' obedience to the Rani will be revealed. The Doctor takes a micro-thermistor from the Rani’s machine and leaves.

Mel is captured by the Tetraps and paralysed by their sting. The Rani sends the Doctor a message that she will exchange Mel for the stolen micro-thermistor.

At the Centre of Leisure, the Doctor and Ikona find that the Lakertyan people are indolent and apathetic. There is a new globe-like device suspended from the Centre, but no one will tell Ikona its purpose. The Rani, using remote control, suddenly stops the globe from spinning and killer insects emerge from it. Everyone runs out of the Centre.

The Doctor agrees to the proposed exchange, but The Rani tricks him with a holographic projection of Mel. The Doctor reinserts the micro-thermistor in her machine, but the combined brain power of the kidnapped geniuses is still not sufficient for her purposes. Urak suggests that she link her own brain in. She refuses and orders that the Doctor’s cabinet be prepared.

The Doctor notes that the Rani has a fixed trajectory rocket launcher and realises that she must be working to meet a specific deadline. Ikona distracts the Tetrap guarding the entrance to the Rani’s fortress and the Doctor enters. He is caught by Urak, paralysed and placed in his cabinet. The Rani then enters a sealed room, followed by Mel; inside is a massive brain. With the Doctor’s input, the brain is able to start carrying out the desired calculations. Urak and the other Tetraps leave the fortress to punish some of the Lakertyans by putting control anklets on them which will kill them if they rebel.

The Rani finds that the Doctor is confusing the brain and orders him disconnected. The Doctor jumps from his cabinet, and he and Mel then trap the Rani inside it. In the control room, the Doctor finds that the Rani’s rocket is intended to strike the asteroid of strange matter. The Rani is using the brain to come up with a lightweight substitute for strange matter in order to detonate the asteroid.

The Rani escapes from the cabinet and explains her plan to the Doctor and Mel. She is trying to create a time manipulator, a cerebral mass capable of dominating and controlling time anywhere in the cosmos, at the expense of all life on the planet. Urak overhears all this. The Doctor gives the brain the correct formula and it devises loyhargil, the required substance. As the production of loyhargil starts in the Rani’s laboratory, the Doctor and Mel escape from the fortress.

The Doctor helps remove the control devices from the Lakertyans, then returns to the fortress and places them around the brain. Beyus stays to complete this task as the Doctor, Mel and Faroon escape. The Doctor confronts the Rani, who detonates the devices. The brain nevertheless completes its countdown and the rocket launches, but because of the Doctor’s interference, it misses the asteroid.

The Rani escapes to her TARDIS, but it has been commandeered by the Tetraps who take her prisoner. Urak tells her they will take her to their home world where she can help them overcome their "plasma needs".

The Doctor takes all the captured geniuses on board the TARDIS so that he can return them home. He also gives the Lakertyans the antidote to the killer insects, but Ikona pours it away as he believes they should solve their own problems from now on.


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PostSubject: Paradise Towers ( Doctor no. 7 saga part 2)   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeSun Nov 01, 2009 7:42 am

Synopsis
The Doctor and Melanie arrive in a dingy tower block, somewhere in post 21st-century Earth. They were expecting their destination, Paradise Towers, to be more welcoming on the basis of the architectural awards it has won. The building is divided between roaming gangs of young girls called Kangs, grouped in colour theme, and the Doctor and Mel encounter the Red Kangs. They have just discovered the death of the last Yellow Kang and are plotting how to attack the Blue Kangs. Elsewhere in the Towers, one of the Caretakers - who act as 'Judge Dredd' style policemen – is hunted down and killed by a robotic cleaner, which seems to appeal to the sadistic Chief Caretaker when he overhears the death.

The Chief then sends a squad of Caretakers to arrest the Red Kangs and in the ensuing confusion the Doctor is split from Mel and captured by the Caretakers. Mel meanwhile heads off to one of the still occupied apartments in which two elderly ladies ('rezzies') live. Tilda and Tabby explain that all the able bodied men left the Towers to fight a war letting the young run riot (the Kangs) while the old stay in their chambers. The only other character still loose in the Towers is Pex, a would-be hero, who whisks Mel away to try and find the fabled swimming pool of the Towers.

At the Caretaker control centre the Doctor is delivered to the Chief Caretaker who greets him as the Great Architect, designer of Paradise Towers, and then promptly calls for him to be killed.

The Doctor challenges the bureaucracy and complex rules of the Caretakers, using their rule-bound nature to make his escape. This appalls the Chief Caretaker, who is obsessed with visiting and feeding a hidden tank in the basement of the Towers. Mel and Pex meanwhile have headed to the top of the building, and are there captured by a party of Blue Kangs. Before the pair are freed the Kangs delight in telling Mel that Pex survived by fleeing from the war.

The Doctor finds the Great Architect is named Kroagnon – a name which seems strangely familiar – and is reunited with the Red Kangs. They explain that many members and Caretakers too have been disappearing in ever greater numbers. While he is being interrogated it becomes clear the Caretakers have tracked him down to the Red Kang headquarters and start to break down the door to their headquarters. Elsewhere Mel has visited Tilda and Tabby again and soon finds herself under threat when it emerges they are cannibals and plan to eat her.

The Doctor succeeds in holding off the Caretakers long enough for the Kangs to flee. Meanwhile Tabby and Tilda are delayed in their eating of Mel when they are disturbed by a noise in the waste disposal. It turns out to be a metal claw, which first drags Tabby to her death in the disposal system, and then Tilda after Pex arrives and finds heroism when he somehow succeeds in saving Mel from her clutches. Mel and Pex find a map of the Towers and decide to venture to the roof, where the luxury swimming pool is located. En route they are menaced by a robotic Cleaner.

The Doctor has meanwhile been taken to the Caretakers HQ again, where he realises that the Chief Caretaker has been allowing the Cleaners to kill people in the Towers, but that the killing has now got out of hand and the Chief Caretaker is no longer in control. This fuels the Chief’s paranoia and fear, and the situation gets worse when the report arrives of the death of the two rezzies in the waste disposal. The intelligence the Chief keeps in the basement is demanding more sustenance and making its own hunting arrangements. When the Chief heads off to investigate the deaths of Tabby and Tilda, the Red Kangs attack the HQ and rescue the Doctor. He returns with them to their base, taking with him the Illustrated Prospectus for the Tower, which they all watch. It reminds the Doctor that Kroagnon, the Great Architect of Paradise Towers, also made Miracle City, a cutting edge development which killed its occupants. It seems Kroagnon had an aversion to people actually populating his buildings. The Blue Kangs arrive suddenly, overpowering the Red ones, but it soon becomes clear their game is over and they must now work together.

When Mel and Pex finally find the swimming pool, Mel takes a dip inside only to be attacked by a robotic killer crab.

The Red Kangs know of the monstrosity in the basement, and guess it must be linked to the terror in the Towers. The Doctor heads off to investigate and there finds the Chief has been herded by the Cleaners toward the mysterious intelligence, which turns out to be Kroagnon himself. The Doctor is soon spotted by the Cleaners too, and the robots start to attack.

The Kangs rescue the Doctor in the nick of time while on the roof Pex fails to rescue Mel, who has to destroy the crab herself. When the Doctor and the Kangs arrive, the latter taunt Pex for his cowardice. The Doctor explains that Kroagnon, the designer of Paradise Towers, felt human beings would ruin his creation and so placed multiple deathtraps throughout the Towers before he was killed and trapped in the machine in the basement. The remaining rezzies(who unlike Tabby and Tilda are not cannibals), led by a woman named Maddy, join them all at the swimming pool and pledge to work together with the Kangs to defeat the menace in the building. Pex pledges to help too. The Deputy Chief Caretaker and the surviving Caretakers, who have become convinced of the peril in the basement too, soon join them.

The Chief Caretaker has now been killed and his corpse animated by the artificial intelligence of Kroagnon. He now intends to use the Cleaners to kill everyone in the Towers and repair the damage the “filthy human parasites” have caused. However, the combined human forces are now fighting back against the machines. The Doctor and Pex also devise a ruse to lure the Chief into a booby trapped room and thereby destroy Kroagnon, but when the plan becomes derailed Pex sacrifices himself to drag the Chief into the trap. They are both killed, but the terror is over.

After a period of reflection and Pex’s funeral, the Doctor and Mel leave Paradise Towers, trusting the remaining Kangs, Rezzies, and Caretakers to build a better society. As the TARDIS dematerialises, a new piece of Kang graffiti is revealed - "Pex Lives".
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PostSubject: Delta and the Bannermen ( Doctor no. 7 saga part 3)   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeSun Nov 01, 2009 7:44 am

Synopsis
On an alien planet the genocide of the Chimeron by the merciless Bannermen led by Gavrok is almost complete. The last survivor, Chimeron Queen Delta, escapes by the skin of her teeth clutching her egg, the future for her species. She makes it to a space tollport where the Navarinos, a race of shape changing tourist aliens, are planning a visit to the planet Earth in 1959 in a spaceship disguised as an old holiday bus. She stows aboard, meeting Mel, while the Doctor follows them in the TARDIS. The Doctor and Mel have won the trip as a prize for arriving in the Navarino spaceport at the right time to be declared the ten billionth customers. No sooner has the tourist vehicle blasted away than the Bannermen turn up, ruthlessly hunting down the fugitive, and they kill the Tollmaster when he refuses to co-operate.

The holiday vehicle from Nostalgia Tours meets an unfortunate collision with an American space satellite and is diverted off track, landing at a holiday camp in South Wales rather than Disneyland. However, the basic but cheerful Shangri-La holiday camp is happy to accommodate the visitors led by the ebullient Burton, who assures the travellers of a warm welcome while they wait for the driver, Murray, to repair their innocuous seeming transport. Mel gets close to Delta and uncovers the truth of her situation, including the hatching of the egg into a bright green baby that starts to grow at a startling rate. The Chimeron Queen supports this development with the equivalent of royal jelly given to bees.

Delta tries to take her mind off the situation and goes to the Shangri-La dance, instantly capturing the heart of Billy, the camp’s mechanic – to the upset of Ray, who loves Billy herself. Ray confides her situation to the Doctor, and they both stumble across a bounty hunter making contact with the Bannermen to tell them of the Chimeron’s whereabouts. It is only a matter of time before Gavrok and his troops arrive. Delta and Billy head off on a romantic countryside ramble the following morning, but the Doctor wastes no time in persuading Burton to evacuate the camp, helping Murray repair the ship, and then heading off to find the young lovers while there is still time. Once they are found, everyone returns to the camp but the situation has become dire. The Bannermen have destroyed the Navarino bus with all its official passengers inside, taking Mel as a hostage, as Gavrok tries to work out how to capture the Chimeron. The Doctor’s early attempts to intercede are futile, but he does rescue Burton and Mel from the Bannermen.

Two Bannermen are holding prisoner two aging American agents, Hawk and Weismuller, who were tracking the missing satellite when they first arrived. The Bannermen were instructed by Gavrok to wait for the Doctor, Burton and Mel on the side of the road. Just before they left the Americans, they place a joined head lock device to prevent them from escaping. While the two Bannerman were placing a tracker on the Doctor, riding Billy's motorbike with Burton and Mel, in an attempt to disguise an ambush attempt, Ray manages to rescue Hawk and Weismuller head locks with an Allen key. They all make contact with the mysterious beekeeper Goronwy, who hides them for a while in his house.

As the two Bannerman find that the Americans have been set free, they track the Doctor’s party to Goronwy House. As they were closing in to the house, the Chimeron child Princess made a high pitched scream of warning which traumatised the ears of the two Bannermen, allowing Delta was able to shoot one of them, while the other escaped to inform Gavrok of the location of Delta and the Princess. At Shangri-La, before leaving to attack Goronwy House, Gavrok booby-trapped the outside of the TARDIS in an attempt to kill the Doctor. As Gavrok and his Bannermen approached Goronwy House shooting, and crashing into the rock-and-roll-music-filled house, only to have honey broken over them in the process. This then set Goronwy's bees on the honey-covered Bannermen. In the meanwhile, the Doctor and his party made it to Shangri-La to set up a defence. Billy rigged up the Shangri-La sound system to amplify the perfectly pitched scream of the Chimeron child Princess – a sound which is excruciatingly painful to Bannermen.

Goronwy explains to Billy the purpose of royal jelly in the lifecycle of the honeybee, provoking the mechanic to consume Delta's equivalent that she has been feeding her daughter, in the hope of metamorphosing into a Chimeron.

As Gavrok and his band of Bannermen attack Shangri-La, the amplified scream of the Chimeron princess traumatised the attackers, including Gavrok, who becomes so stunned that he falls into the beam of the booby-trap he placed on the TARDIS and is incinerated. Other Bannermen are so traumatised that they are easily rounded up. Delta and Billy leave together with the child and the prisoners, heading for an intergalactic war crimes tribunal. To their delight, The Doctor shows Hawk and Weismuller the missing satellite nearby. All is well and the next bus of holidaymakers, this time human, arrive at Shangri-La as the Doctor and Mel slip away
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PostSubject: Dragonfire ( doctor no. 7 saga part 3)   Doctor Who? Icon_minitimeSun Nov 01, 2009 7:46 am

Synopsis
Iceworld is a space-trading colony on the dark side of the planet Svartos. It is a mysterious place of terror and rumour ruled by the callous and vindictive Kane, who buys supporters and employees and makes them wear his mark iced in to their flesh. Kane’s body temperature is so cold that one touch from him can kill. In Kane’s lair is a vast cryogenic section where mercenaries and others are being frozen and stored, with their memories wiped for future unquestioning use as part of an army; including a freezer cabinet into which Kane deposits himself when he needs to cool down. There is also, most peculiarly, an aged sculptor who is carving a statue from the ice.

The TARDIS materialises in a refrigeration sales section on Iceworld and the Seventh Doctor and Melanie Bush venture outside. They soon meet up with their roguish old acquaintance, Sabalom Glitz, who owes Kane a substantial amount of money. Glitz has come to Svartos to search for a supposed treasure guarded by a dragon. It is located in the icy caverns beyond Iceworld and by chance Glitz has a map, which he won from Kane in a gamble – indeed, Kane wanted him to have the map because he wishes to use Glitz as a pawn in his own search for the treasure. Thus the map contains a tracking device in its seal. Kane in return has Glitz’s ship, the Nosferatu, which he orders destroyed. Without realising he is being used, Glitz heads off on the search with the Doctor in tow – though women are not allowed on the expedition so Mel stays with a young, rebellious waitress they have met called Ace. It is only a matter of time before Ace behaves appallingly to customers and is fired. Mel is stunned to hear that Ace is a human from late twentieth century Earth who only arrived on Iceworld after a bizarre chemistry experiment caused a time-storm in her bedroom.

Kane’s staff are not happy. Once they have taken his coin they are his for life – as Ace wisely realises when she rejects such an offer. Officer Belazs was not so clever, and is keen to escape Kane’s service. She thus arranges for the Nosferatu not to be destroyed, hoping to use the craft to escape Iceworld. When this fails she tries to persuade Officer Kracauer to help her overthrow Kane, but he is one step ahead. Their attempt to alter the temperature in his chambers and kill him fails, so Kane exacts his revenge and kills them both. The same fate awaits the ice sculptor who has now finished his statue, which is of a woman called Xana.

In the ice caverns it has taken time but the Doctor and Glitz have encountered the dragon, which turns out to be a biped which did not so much breathe fire as fire lasers from its eyes, but not the treasure. Mel and Ace have now ventured into the caverns too and they meet their allies and are actually defended by the dragon, which guns down some of Kane’s cryogenically altered soldiers who have been sent into the ice caverns to kill them. The dragon takes them to a room in the ice, which is some sort of control area and contains a pre-recorded hologram message. The hologram explains that Kane is one half of the Kane-Xana criminal gang from the planet Proamnon. When the security forces caught up with them Xana killed herself to avoid arrest, but Kane was captured and exiled to the cold, dark side of Svartos. It turns out that Iceworld is a huge spacecraft and the treasure is a crystal inside the dragon’s head, which acts as the key that Kane needs in order to activate the ship and free himself from exile. The dragon is thus both Kane’s jailer and his chance of freedom.

Kane has overheard the location of the key through the bugging device on the map and now sends his security forces to the ice caverns to bring him the head of the dragon, offering vast rewards for such bravery. He also uses his cryogenic army to cause chaos in the Iceworld shops, driving the customers out and towards the docked Nosferatu. This is brutally accomplished. When the Nosferatu takes off Kane blows it up. The only survivors are a young girl called Stella and her mother, who have become separated but both survive the massacre. Shortly afterward two of Kane’s troopers succeed in killing the dragon and removing its head, but are killed in the process.

The Doctor has meanwhile realised that Kane has been a prisoner on Svartos for millennia. He retrieves the head of the dragon and is then told by intercom that Kane has captured Ace but is willing to trade her for the “dragonfire”. The Doctor, Glitz and Mel travel to Kane’s private chambers for the exchange. Kane rises to the Doctor’s taunts but still powers up Iceworld as a spacecraft, which now detaches itself from the surface of Svartos. However, when Kane tries to set course for Proamnon to exact his revenge he realises he has been a prisoner so long that the planet no longer exists. In desperation, he opens a screen in the surface of his ship and lets in hot light rays, which kill him by melting him rather horrifically.

The Doctor now loses a companion but also gains one. Glitz has claimed Iceworld as his own spacecraft, renamed Nosferatu II, and Mel decides to stay with him to keep him out of trouble. The Doctor acquires Ace instead, promising to take her home to Perivale via the “scenic route”.
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